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Association of metabolic syndrome with decreased glomerular filtration rate among 75,468 Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The impact of the various elements of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been conflicting. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to examine the association of MetS and its components with decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR).

METHODS

A total of 75,468 urban workers who underwent annual health examinations under the auspices of the local governments between March 2010 and September 2012 at the health examination center of Xuzhou center hospital were enrolled in the cross-sectional survey. Decreased GFR was defined as an estimated GFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. The definition of MetS was based on the most-recent interim joint consensus definition, requiring any three of the five components, consisting of elevated blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), or triglycerides (TG), reduced high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), and obesity.

RESULTS

MetS was related to the reduced GFR with an odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 1.43 (1.13-1.83). In multivariable analyses, individual components of MetS that were independently associated with decreased GFR were elevated BP (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.00-1.78), low HDL-c (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.44-2.43), and elevated FPG (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.85). The age-adjusted population-attributable risk percent (PARP) for reduced GFR was 27.55%, 19.67% and14.31% for elevated BP, low HDL-c and elevated FPG respectively. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of decreased GFR were 1.70(1.11-2.60), 2.38(1.53-3.71), or 4.11(2.42-6.98) for those with 1, 2, or 3 critical elements (versus zero), respectively. The corresponding multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of decreased GFR were 1.11(0.84-1.48) and 0.89(0.63-1.27) for those with 1 or 2 noncritical components (versus zero), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

We concluded that various elements of MetS and the cumulative number of MetS should not be considered indiscriminately as risk factors for reduced GFR.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    ,

    Division of Nephrology, Xuzhou Central Hospital, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    Source

    PloS one 9:11 2014 pg e113450

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    China
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Glomerular Filtration Rate
    Humans
    Kidney
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
    Risk Factors
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25415451

    Citation

    Song, Hui, et al. "Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Decreased Glomerular Filtration Rate Among 75,468 Chinese Adults: a Cross-sectional Study." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 11, 2014, pp. e113450.
    Song H, Wang X, Cai Q, et al. Association of metabolic syndrome with decreased glomerular filtration rate among 75,468 Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(11):e113450.
    Song, H., Wang, X., Cai, Q., Ding, W., Huang, S., & Zhuo, L. (2014). Association of metabolic syndrome with decreased glomerular filtration rate among 75,468 Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study. PloS One, 9(11), pp. e113450. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0113450.
    Song H, et al. Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Decreased Glomerular Filtration Rate Among 75,468 Chinese Adults: a Cross-sectional Study. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(11):e113450. PubMed PMID: 25415451.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association of metabolic syndrome with decreased glomerular filtration rate among 75,468 Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study. AU - Song,Hui, AU - Wang,Xiuying, AU - Cai,Qingqing, AU - Ding,Weijie, AU - Huang,Shuiping, AU - Zhuo,Lang, Y1 - 2014/11/21/ PY - 2014/06/25/received PY - 2014/10/24/accepted PY - 2014/11/22/entrez PY - 2014/11/22/pubmed PY - 2015/12/31/medline SP - e113450 EP - e113450 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The impact of the various elements of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been conflicting. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to examine the association of MetS and its components with decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). METHODS: A total of 75,468 urban workers who underwent annual health examinations under the auspices of the local governments between March 2010 and September 2012 at the health examination center of Xuzhou center hospital were enrolled in the cross-sectional survey. Decreased GFR was defined as an estimated GFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. The definition of MetS was based on the most-recent interim joint consensus definition, requiring any three of the five components, consisting of elevated blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), or triglycerides (TG), reduced high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), and obesity. RESULTS: MetS was related to the reduced GFR with an odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 1.43 (1.13-1.83). In multivariable analyses, individual components of MetS that were independently associated with decreased GFR were elevated BP (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.00-1.78), low HDL-c (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.44-2.43), and elevated FPG (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.85). The age-adjusted population-attributable risk percent (PARP) for reduced GFR was 27.55%, 19.67% and14.31% for elevated BP, low HDL-c and elevated FPG respectively. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of decreased GFR were 1.70(1.11-2.60), 2.38(1.53-3.71), or 4.11(2.42-6.98) for those with 1, 2, or 3 critical elements (versus zero), respectively. The corresponding multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of decreased GFR were 1.11(0.84-1.48) and 0.89(0.63-1.27) for those with 1 or 2 noncritical components (versus zero), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that various elements of MetS and the cumulative number of MetS should not be considered indiscriminately as risk factors for reduced GFR. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25415451/Association_of_metabolic_syndrome_with_decreased_glomerular_filtration_rate_among_75468_Chinese_adults:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0113450 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -