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Pattern recognition receptors in antifungal immunity.
Semin Immunopathol. 2015 Mar; 37(2):97-106.SI

Abstract

Receptors of the innate immune system are the first line of defence against infection, being able to recognise and initiate an inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. The Toll-like (TLR), NOD-like (NLR), RIG-I-like (RLR) and C-type lectin-like receptors (CLR) are four receptor families that contribute to the recognition of a vast range of species, including fungi. Many of these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are able to initiate innate immunity and polarise adaptive responses upon the recognition of fungal cell wall components and other conserved molecular patterns, including fungal nucleic acids. These receptors induce effective mechanisms of fungal clearance in normal hosts, but medical interventions, immunosuppression or genetic predisposition can lead to susceptibility to fungal infections. In this review, we highlight the importance of PRRs in fungal infection, specifically CLRs, which are the major PRR involved. We will describe specific PRRs in detail, the importance of receptor collaboration in fungal recognition and clearance, and describe how genetic aberrations in PRRs can contribute to disease pathology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Applied Medicine Immunity, Infection and Inflammation Programme Room 4.20, Institute of Medical Sciences, Ashgrove Road West University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25420452

Citation

Plato, Anthony, et al. "Pattern Recognition Receptors in Antifungal Immunity." Seminars in Immunopathology, vol. 37, no. 2, 2015, pp. 97-106.
Plato A, Hardison SE, Brown GD. Pattern recognition receptors in antifungal immunity. Semin Immunopathol. 2015;37(2):97-106.
Plato, A., Hardison, S. E., & Brown, G. D. (2015). Pattern recognition receptors in antifungal immunity. Seminars in Immunopathology, 37(2), 97-106. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00281-014-0462-4
Plato A, Hardison SE, Brown GD. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Antifungal Immunity. Semin Immunopathol. 2015;37(2):97-106. PubMed PMID: 25420452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pattern recognition receptors in antifungal immunity. AU - Plato,Anthony, AU - Hardison,Sarah E, AU - Brown,Gordon D, Y1 - 2014/11/25/ PY - 2014/07/23/received PY - 2014/11/04/accepted PY - 2014/11/26/entrez PY - 2014/11/26/pubmed PY - 2015/10/24/medline SP - 97 EP - 106 JF - Seminars in immunopathology JO - Semin Immunopathol VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - Receptors of the innate immune system are the first line of defence against infection, being able to recognise and initiate an inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. The Toll-like (TLR), NOD-like (NLR), RIG-I-like (RLR) and C-type lectin-like receptors (CLR) are four receptor families that contribute to the recognition of a vast range of species, including fungi. Many of these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are able to initiate innate immunity and polarise adaptive responses upon the recognition of fungal cell wall components and other conserved molecular patterns, including fungal nucleic acids. These receptors induce effective mechanisms of fungal clearance in normal hosts, but medical interventions, immunosuppression or genetic predisposition can lead to susceptibility to fungal infections. In this review, we highlight the importance of PRRs in fungal infection, specifically CLRs, which are the major PRR involved. We will describe specific PRRs in detail, the importance of receptor collaboration in fungal recognition and clearance, and describe how genetic aberrations in PRRs can contribute to disease pathology. SN - 1863-2300 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25420452/Pattern_recognition_receptors_in_antifungal_immunity_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-014-0462-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -