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Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats.
Br J Pharmacol 2015; 172(7):1783-91BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Growing evidence shows cannabidiol (CBD) modulates some of the effects of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD is a constituent of some strains of recreational cannabis but its content is highly variable. High CBD strains may have less memory-impairing effects than low-CBD strains and CBD can reverse behavioural effects of THC in monkeys. CBD/THC interactions in rodents are more complicated as CBD can attenuate or exacerbate the effects of THC. This study was undertaken to determine if CBD could reverse hypothermia or hypolocomotor effects caused by THC in rats.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with radiotelemetry devices and then given doses of THC (10-30 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.) with or without CBD. Experiments determined the effect of simultaneous or 30 min pretreatment with CBD in a 1:1 ratio with THC, as well as the effect of CBD in a 3:1 ratio. Additional experiments determined the effects of pretreatment with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant).

KEY RESULTS

CBD did not attentuate THC-induced hypothermia or hypolocomotion but instead exaggerated these effects in some conditions. The antagonist SR141716 blocked hypolocomotor effects of THC for the first hour after injection and the hypothermia for 6 h; thus validating the pharmacological model.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

There is no evidence from this study that elevated CBD content in cannabis could provide protection from the physiological effects of THC, in rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25425111

Citation

Taffe, Michael A., et al. "Cannabidiol Fails to Reverse Hypothermia or Locomotor Suppression Induced By Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley Rats." British Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 172, no. 7, 2015, pp. 1783-91.
Taffe MA, Creehan KM, Vandewater SA. Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats. Br J Pharmacol. 2015;172(7):1783-91.
Taffe, M. A., Creehan, K. M., & Vandewater, S. A. (2015). Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats. British Journal of Pharmacology, 172(7), pp. 1783-91. doi:10.1111/bph.13024.
Taffe MA, Creehan KM, Vandewater SA. Cannabidiol Fails to Reverse Hypothermia or Locomotor Suppression Induced By Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley Rats. Br J Pharmacol. 2015;172(7):1783-91. PubMed PMID: 25425111.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats. AU - Taffe,Michael A, AU - Creehan,Kevin M, AU - Vandewater,Sophia A, Y1 - 2015/01/23/ PY - 2014/08/29/received PY - 2014/10/17/revised PY - 2014/11/18/accepted PY - 2014/11/27/entrez PY - 2014/11/27/pubmed PY - 2015/12/23/medline SP - 1783 EP - 91 JF - British journal of pharmacology JO - Br. J. Pharmacol. VL - 172 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Growing evidence shows cannabidiol (CBD) modulates some of the effects of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD is a constituent of some strains of recreational cannabis but its content is highly variable. High CBD strains may have less memory-impairing effects than low-CBD strains and CBD can reverse behavioural effects of THC in monkeys. CBD/THC interactions in rodents are more complicated as CBD can attenuate or exacerbate the effects of THC. This study was undertaken to determine if CBD could reverse hypothermia or hypolocomotor effects caused by THC in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with radiotelemetry devices and then given doses of THC (10-30 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.) with or without CBD. Experiments determined the effect of simultaneous or 30 min pretreatment with CBD in a 1:1 ratio with THC, as well as the effect of CBD in a 3:1 ratio. Additional experiments determined the effects of pretreatment with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant). KEY RESULTS: CBD did not attentuate THC-induced hypothermia or hypolocomotion but instead exaggerated these effects in some conditions. The antagonist SR141716 blocked hypolocomotor effects of THC for the first hour after injection and the hypothermia for 6 h; thus validating the pharmacological model. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: There is no evidence from this study that elevated CBD content in cannabis could provide protection from the physiological effects of THC, in rats. SN - 1476-5381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25425111/Cannabidiol_fails_to_reverse_hypothermia_or_locomotor_suppression_induced_by_Δ_9___tetrahydrocannabinol_in_Sprague_Dawley_rats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bph.13024 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -