Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots.
J R Army Med Corps. 2015 Jun; 161(2):140-3.JR

Abstract

Military recruits are known to be susceptible to Achilles tendon pathology. The British Army have introduced footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), in an attempt to reduce the incidence of injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the Achilles tendon forces of the cross-trainer and running shoe in relation to conventional army boots. Ten male participants ran at 4.0 m/s in each footwear condition. Achilles tendon forces were obtained throughout the stance phase of running and compared using repeated-measures ANOVAs. The results showed that the time to peak Achilles tendon force was significantly shorter when running in conventional army boots (0.12 s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (0.13 s) and running shoe (0.13 s). Achilles tendon loading rate was shown to be significantly greater in conventional army boots (38.73 BW/s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (35.14 BW/s) and running shoe (33.57 BW/s). The results of this study suggest that the running shoes and cross-trainer footwear are associated with reductions in Achilles tendon parameters that have been linked to the aetiology of injury, and thus it can be hypothesised that these footwear could be beneficial for military recruits undertaking running exercises.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Applied Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.Centre for Applied Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25428136

Citation

Sinclair, Jonathan, et al. "Influence of Running Shoes and Cross-trainers On Achilles Tendon Forces During Running Compared With Military Boots." Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, vol. 161, no. 2, 2015, pp. 140-3.
Sinclair J, Taylor PJ, Atkins S. Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots. J R Army Med Corps. 2015;161(2):140-3.
Sinclair, J., Taylor, P. J., & Atkins, S. (2015). Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, 161(2), 140-3. https://doi.org/10.1136/jramc-2014-000308
Sinclair J, Taylor PJ, Atkins S. Influence of Running Shoes and Cross-trainers On Achilles Tendon Forces During Running Compared With Military Boots. J R Army Med Corps. 2015;161(2):140-3. PubMed PMID: 25428136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots. AU - Sinclair,Jonathan, AU - Taylor,P J, AU - Atkins,S, Y1 - 2014/11/26/ PY - 2014/04/14/received PY - 2014/09/24/accepted PY - 2014/11/28/entrez PY - 2014/11/28/pubmed PY - 2015/8/14/medline KW - Achilles tendon KW - Footwear KW - Running SP - 140 EP - 3 JF - Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps JO - J R Army Med Corps VL - 161 IS - 2 N2 - Military recruits are known to be susceptible to Achilles tendon pathology. The British Army have introduced footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), in an attempt to reduce the incidence of injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the Achilles tendon forces of the cross-trainer and running shoe in relation to conventional army boots. Ten male participants ran at 4.0 m/s in each footwear condition. Achilles tendon forces were obtained throughout the stance phase of running and compared using repeated-measures ANOVAs. The results showed that the time to peak Achilles tendon force was significantly shorter when running in conventional army boots (0.12 s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (0.13 s) and running shoe (0.13 s). Achilles tendon loading rate was shown to be significantly greater in conventional army boots (38.73 BW/s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (35.14 BW/s) and running shoe (33.57 BW/s). The results of this study suggest that the running shoes and cross-trainer footwear are associated with reductions in Achilles tendon parameters that have been linked to the aetiology of injury, and thus it can be hypothesised that these footwear could be beneficial for military recruits undertaking running exercises. SN - 0035-8665 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25428136/Influence_of_running_shoes_and_cross_trainers_on_Achilles_tendon_forces_during_running_compared_with_military_boots_ L2 - http://militaryhealth.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25428136 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -