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Maternal intimate partner violence exposure, child cortisol reactivity and child asthma.
Child Abuse Negl. 2015 Oct; 48:50-7.CA

Abstract

Psychosocial stressors like intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure are associated with increased risk of childhood asthma. Longitudinal studies have not investigated the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity (and associated alterations in cortisol release) in the child IPV exposure-asthma association. We sought to investigate this association, and to assess whether this relationship differs by child HPA reactivity. This secondary analysis used longitudinal cohort data from the Family Life Project. Participants included 1,292 low-income children and mothers; maternal interview and child biomarker data, including maternal report of IPV and child asthma, and child salivary cortisol obtained with validated stress reactivity paradigms, were collected when the child was 7, 15, 24, 35, and 48 months. Using structural equation modeling, maternal IPV when the child was 7 months of age predicted subsequent reports of childhood asthma (B=0.18, p=.002). This association differed according to the child's HPA reactivity status, with IPV exposed children who were HPA reactors at 7 and 15 months of age--defined as a ≥10% increase in cortisol level twenty minutes post peak arousal during the challenge tasks and a raw increase of at least .02μg/dl--being significantly at risk for asthma (7 months: B=0.17, p=.02; 15 months: B=0.17, p=.02). Our findings provide support that children who are physiologically reactive are the most vulnerable to adverse health outcomes when faced with environmental stressors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, 88 East Newton Street, Vose 305, Boston, MA 02118, USA.Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 200 North Wolfe Street, Division of General Pediatrics, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Research, Arizona State University, 550 East Orange Street, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA; School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins, 525 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Applied Psychology, New York University, 246 Greene Street, New York, NY 10003, USA.Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, 88 East Newton Street, Vose 305, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 200 North Wolfe Street, Division of General Pediatrics, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Research, Arizona State University, 550 East Orange Street, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA; School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins, 525 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Applied Psychology, New York University, 246 Greene Street, New York, NY 10003, USA.No affiliation info availableDepartment of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 200 North Wolfe Street, Division of General Pediatrics, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25435104

Citation

Bair-Merritt, Megan H., et al. "Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Exposure, Child Cortisol Reactivity and Child Asthma." Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 48, 2015, pp. 50-7.
Bair-Merritt MH, Voegtline K, Ghazarian SR, et al. Maternal intimate partner violence exposure, child cortisol reactivity and child asthma. Child Abuse Negl. 2015;48:50-7.
Bair-Merritt, M. H., Voegtline, K., Ghazarian, S. R., Granger, D. A., Blair, C., & Johnson, S. B. (2015). Maternal intimate partner violence exposure, child cortisol reactivity and child asthma. Child Abuse & Neglect, 48, 50-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2014.11.003
Bair-Merritt MH, et al. Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Exposure, Child Cortisol Reactivity and Child Asthma. Child Abuse Negl. 2015;48:50-7. PubMed PMID: 25435104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal intimate partner violence exposure, child cortisol reactivity and child asthma. AU - Bair-Merritt,Megan H, AU - Voegtline,Kristin, AU - Ghazarian,Sharon R, AU - Granger,Douglas A, AU - Blair,Clancy, AU - ,, AU - Johnson,Sara B, Y1 - 2014/11/27/ PY - 2014/07/26/received PY - 2014/10/31/revised PY - 2014/11/04/accepted PY - 2014/12/2/entrez PY - 2014/12/2/pubmed PY - 2016/8/23/medline KW - Asthma KW - Cortisol KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Longitudinal SP - 50 EP - 7 JF - Child abuse & neglect JO - Child Abuse Negl VL - 48 N2 - Psychosocial stressors like intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure are associated with increased risk of childhood asthma. Longitudinal studies have not investigated the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity (and associated alterations in cortisol release) in the child IPV exposure-asthma association. We sought to investigate this association, and to assess whether this relationship differs by child HPA reactivity. This secondary analysis used longitudinal cohort data from the Family Life Project. Participants included 1,292 low-income children and mothers; maternal interview and child biomarker data, including maternal report of IPV and child asthma, and child salivary cortisol obtained with validated stress reactivity paradigms, were collected when the child was 7, 15, 24, 35, and 48 months. Using structural equation modeling, maternal IPV when the child was 7 months of age predicted subsequent reports of childhood asthma (B=0.18, p=.002). This association differed according to the child's HPA reactivity status, with IPV exposed children who were HPA reactors at 7 and 15 months of age--defined as a ≥10% increase in cortisol level twenty minutes post peak arousal during the challenge tasks and a raw increase of at least .02μg/dl--being significantly at risk for asthma (7 months: B=0.17, p=.02; 15 months: B=0.17, p=.02). Our findings provide support that children who are physiologically reactive are the most vulnerable to adverse health outcomes when faced with environmental stressors. SN - 1873-7757 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25435104/Maternal_intimate_partner_violence_exposure_child_cortisol_reactivity_and_child_asthma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0145-2134(14)00372-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -