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Extracts of Actinidia arguta stems inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses through nuclear factor-κB pathway in Raw 264.7 cells.
Nutr Res. 2014 Nov; 34(11):1008-16.NR

Abstract

The inflammatory response protects our body from bacteria and tumors, but chronic inflammation driven by the persistent activation of macrophages can lead to serious adverse effects including gastrointestinal problems, cardiac disorders, and a sore throat. Part of the ongoing research is focused on searching for antiinflammatory compounds from natural sources, so we investigated the effects of hardy kiwis (Actinidia arguta, Lauraceae) stems on inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Raw 264.7 cells to test the hypothesis that antiinflammatory effects of A. arguta stems were exerted through the inhibition of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. The methanol extract of A. arguta (20 μg/mL) stems lowered nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells by 40%. It was then partitioned with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water based on the polarity of each compound. Among the 5 layers, the chloroform layer had the greatest inhibitory effect on LPS-stimulated nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression in Raw 264.7 cells. However, the levels of prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygease 2 were not altered. On the other hand, treatment of cells with the chloroform layer of A. arguta before LPS stimulation also reduced them RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits induced by LPS was also inhibited by treatment with the chloroform layer of A. arguta. This was accompanied with the reduced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, and p38. Taken together, these results suggest that chloroform layer of A. arguta exerted antiinflammatory effects by the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB.

Authors+Show Affiliations

World Class University, Department of Nanobiomedicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25441150

Citation

Kim, Hae-Young, et al. "Extracts of Actinidia Arguta Stems Inhibited LPS-induced Inflammatory Responses Through Nuclear factor-κB Pathway in Raw 264.7 Cells." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 34, no. 11, 2014, pp. 1008-16.
Kim HY, Hwang KW, Park SY. Extracts of Actinidia arguta stems inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses through nuclear factor-κB pathway in Raw 264.7 cells. Nutr Res. 2014;34(11):1008-16.
Kim, H. Y., Hwang, K. W., & Park, S. Y. (2014). Extracts of Actinidia arguta stems inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses through nuclear factor-κB pathway in Raw 264.7 cells. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 34(11), 1008-16.
Kim HY, Hwang KW, Park SY. Extracts of Actinidia Arguta Stems Inhibited LPS-induced Inflammatory Responses Through Nuclear factor-κB Pathway in Raw 264.7 Cells. Nutr Res. 2014;34(11):1008-16. PubMed PMID: 25441150.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extracts of Actinidia arguta stems inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses through nuclear factor-κB pathway in Raw 264.7 cells. AU - Kim,Hae-Young, AU - Hwang,Kwang Woo, AU - Park,So-Young, PY - 2014/03/18/received PY - 2014/08/28/revised PY - 2014/08/29/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline SP - 1008 EP - 16 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 34 IS - 11 N2 - The inflammatory response protects our body from bacteria and tumors, but chronic inflammation driven by the persistent activation of macrophages can lead to serious adverse effects including gastrointestinal problems, cardiac disorders, and a sore throat. Part of the ongoing research is focused on searching for antiinflammatory compounds from natural sources, so we investigated the effects of hardy kiwis (Actinidia arguta, Lauraceae) stems on inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Raw 264.7 cells to test the hypothesis that antiinflammatory effects of A. arguta stems were exerted through the inhibition of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. The methanol extract of A. arguta (20 μg/mL) stems lowered nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells by 40%. It was then partitioned with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water based on the polarity of each compound. Among the 5 layers, the chloroform layer had the greatest inhibitory effect on LPS-stimulated nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression in Raw 264.7 cells. However, the levels of prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygease 2 were not altered. On the other hand, treatment of cells with the chloroform layer of A. arguta before LPS stimulation also reduced them RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits induced by LPS was also inhibited by treatment with the chloroform layer of A. arguta. This was accompanied with the reduced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, and p38. Taken together, these results suggest that chloroform layer of A. arguta exerted antiinflammatory effects by the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25441150/Extracts_of_Actinidia_arguta_stems_inhibited_LPS_induced_inflammatory_responses_through_nuclear_factor_κB_pathway_in_Raw_264_7_cells_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(14)00170-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -