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Changing beverage consumption patterns have resulted in fewer liquid calories in the diets of US children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010.
J Acad Nutr Diet 2015; 115(4):559-66.e4JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Beverage consumption patterns have been linked to obesity and chronic disease risk. Although the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has decreased recently, little is known about the parallel trends in intake of other beverages.

OBJECTIVE

To describe recent trends in consumption of all commonly consumed beverages among US children aged 2 to 19 years.

DESIGN

Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls from 18,541 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001-2010 were used to assess beverage intake, including SSBs (ie, sodas, fruit-flavored drinks, sport and energy drinks, fruit juices, coffees/teas, and other [nondairy] sugar-sweetened drinks); milks (ie, plain whole, reduced fat, and low-/nonfat, sweetened, other milks/milk-based drinks, and milk alternatives); 100% juices (ie, fruit, and vegetable/mixed without added sugar); low-/no-calorie beverages (ie, unsweetened or artificially sweetened: sodas, coffees/teas, flavored waters, diet sport/energy drinks, and other low/no-calorie drinks); alcohol-containing; and plain water (during 2005-2010 only). Weighted mean intakes (percent total energy and total ounces) and consumption prevalence were estimated. Regression models and analytical procedures that account for the complex sampling methods were used to test trends.

RESULTS

Between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010, total daily beverage consumption (excluding water) decreased from 24.4% to 21.1% energy (32.0 to 27.9 oz). Significant decreases (P<0.05) occurred in sugar-sweetened sodas (13.5% to 10.2% energy), whole milk (2.7% to 1.6% energy), fruit juices with sugar added (2.3% to 2.1% energy), and fruit-flavored drinks (1.6% to 0.8% energy). Significant increases occurred for sweetened coffees/teas, energy drinks, sport drinks, and unsweetened juices though the contribution of each to total energy intake remained <1%. Low-/no-calorie drink consumption also increased, rising from 0.2 to 1.3 oz/day.

CONCLUSIONS

Changing beverage consumption patterns reflect positive trends in the form of reduced intake of SSBs, whole milk, and total calories from beverages. Although the consumption of sport drinks, energy drinks, and low-calorie beverages have increased, their contribution to total beverage intake remains small.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25441966

Citation

Mesirow, Maurissa S C., and Jean A. Welsh. "Changing Beverage Consumption Patterns Have Resulted in Fewer Liquid Calories in the Diets of US Children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 115, no. 4, 2015, pp. 559-66.e4.
Mesirow MS, Welsh JA. Changing beverage consumption patterns have resulted in fewer liquid calories in the diets of US children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015;115(4):559-66.e4.
Mesirow, M. S., & Welsh, J. A. (2015). Changing beverage consumption patterns have resulted in fewer liquid calories in the diets of US children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(4), pp. 559-66.e4. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2014.09.004.
Mesirow MS, Welsh JA. Changing Beverage Consumption Patterns Have Resulted in Fewer Liquid Calories in the Diets of US Children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015;115(4):559-66.e4. PubMed PMID: 25441966.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changing beverage consumption patterns have resulted in fewer liquid calories in the diets of US children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010. AU - Mesirow,Maurissa S C, AU - Welsh,Jean A, Y1 - 2014/11/07/ PY - 2014/04/16/received PY - 2014/09/03/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/5/27/medline KW - Beverages KW - Diet KW - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KW - Pediatrics KW - United States SP - 559 EP - 66.e4 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 115 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Beverage consumption patterns have been linked to obesity and chronic disease risk. Although the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has decreased recently, little is known about the parallel trends in intake of other beverages. OBJECTIVE: To describe recent trends in consumption of all commonly consumed beverages among US children aged 2 to 19 years. DESIGN: Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls from 18,541 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001-2010 were used to assess beverage intake, including SSBs (ie, sodas, fruit-flavored drinks, sport and energy drinks, fruit juices, coffees/teas, and other [nondairy] sugar-sweetened drinks); milks (ie, plain whole, reduced fat, and low-/nonfat, sweetened, other milks/milk-based drinks, and milk alternatives); 100% juices (ie, fruit, and vegetable/mixed without added sugar); low-/no-calorie beverages (ie, unsweetened or artificially sweetened: sodas, coffees/teas, flavored waters, diet sport/energy drinks, and other low/no-calorie drinks); alcohol-containing; and plain water (during 2005-2010 only). Weighted mean intakes (percent total energy and total ounces) and consumption prevalence were estimated. Regression models and analytical procedures that account for the complex sampling methods were used to test trends. RESULTS: Between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010, total daily beverage consumption (excluding water) decreased from 24.4% to 21.1% energy (32.0 to 27.9 oz). Significant decreases (P<0.05) occurred in sugar-sweetened sodas (13.5% to 10.2% energy), whole milk (2.7% to 1.6% energy), fruit juices with sugar added (2.3% to 2.1% energy), and fruit-flavored drinks (1.6% to 0.8% energy). Significant increases occurred for sweetened coffees/teas, energy drinks, sport drinks, and unsweetened juices though the contribution of each to total energy intake remained <1%. Low-/no-calorie drink consumption also increased, rising from 0.2 to 1.3 oz/day. CONCLUSIONS: Changing beverage consumption patterns reflect positive trends in the form of reduced intake of SSBs, whole milk, and total calories from beverages. Although the consumption of sport drinks, energy drinks, and low-calorie beverages have increased, their contribution to total beverage intake remains small. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25441966/Changing_beverage_consumption_patterns_have_resulted_in_fewer_liquid_calories_in_the_diets_of_US_children:_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_2001_2010_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(14)01368-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -