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Early-life stress selectively affects gastrointestinal but not behavioral responses in a genetic model of brain-gut axis dysfunction.
Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2015 Jan; 27(1):105-13.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Early-life stress and a genetic predisposition to display an anxiety- and depressive-like phenotype are associated with behavioral and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animals exposed to early-life stress, and those genetically predisposed to display anxiety or depressive behaviors, have proven useful tools in which to study stress-related GI disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a heterogeneous disorder, and likely a consequence of both genetic and environmental factors. However, the combined effects of early-life stress and a genetic predisposition to display anxiety- and depression-like behaviors on GI function have not been investigated.

METHODS

We assessed the effect of maternal separation (MS) on behavioral and GI responses in WKY animals relative to a normo-anxious reference strain.

KEY RESULTS

Both non-separated (NS) WKY and WKY-MS animals displayed anxiety-like responses in the open-field test and depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. However, MS had no further influence on anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors exhibited by this stress-prone rat strain. Similarly, corticosterone levels measured after the OFT were insensitive to MS in WKY animals. However, WKY-MS displayed significantly increased colonic visceral hypersensitivity, fecal output, and altered colonic cholinergic sensitivity.

CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES

Our data suggest that early-life stress, on the background of a genetic predisposition to display an anxiety- and depressive-like phenotype, selectively influences GI function rather than stress-related behaviors. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of genetic predisposition on the outcome of early-life adversity on GI function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25443141

Citation

Hyland, N P., et al. "Early-life Stress Selectively Affects Gastrointestinal but Not Behavioral Responses in a Genetic Model of Brain-gut Axis Dysfunction." Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, vol. 27, no. 1, 2015, pp. 105-13.
Hyland NP, O'Mahony SM, O'Malley D, et al. Early-life stress selectively affects gastrointestinal but not behavioral responses in a genetic model of brain-gut axis dysfunction. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2015;27(1):105-13.
Hyland, N. P., O'Mahony, S. M., O'Malley, D., O'Mahony, C. M., Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2015). Early-life stress selectively affects gastrointestinal but not behavioral responses in a genetic model of brain-gut axis dysfunction. Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, 27(1), 105-13. https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.12486
Hyland NP, et al. Early-life Stress Selectively Affects Gastrointestinal but Not Behavioral Responses in a Genetic Model of Brain-gut Axis Dysfunction. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2015;27(1):105-13. PubMed PMID: 25443141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early-life stress selectively affects gastrointestinal but not behavioral responses in a genetic model of brain-gut axis dysfunction. AU - Hyland,N P, AU - O'Mahony,S M, AU - O'Malley,D, AU - O'Mahony,C M, AU - Dinan,T G, AU - Cryan,J F, Y1 - 2014/12/02/ PY - 2014/09/03/received PY - 2014/11/15/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/8/28/medline KW - Wistar Kyoto KW - colon KW - gene-environment KW - maternal separation KW - visceral hypersensitivity SP - 105 EP - 13 JF - Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society JO - Neurogastroenterol Motil VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Early-life stress and a genetic predisposition to display an anxiety- and depressive-like phenotype are associated with behavioral and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animals exposed to early-life stress, and those genetically predisposed to display anxiety or depressive behaviors, have proven useful tools in which to study stress-related GI disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a heterogeneous disorder, and likely a consequence of both genetic and environmental factors. However, the combined effects of early-life stress and a genetic predisposition to display anxiety- and depression-like behaviors on GI function have not been investigated. METHODS: We assessed the effect of maternal separation (MS) on behavioral and GI responses in WKY animals relative to a normo-anxious reference strain. KEY RESULTS: Both non-separated (NS) WKY and WKY-MS animals displayed anxiety-like responses in the open-field test and depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. However, MS had no further influence on anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors exhibited by this stress-prone rat strain. Similarly, corticosterone levels measured after the OFT were insensitive to MS in WKY animals. However, WKY-MS displayed significantly increased colonic visceral hypersensitivity, fecal output, and altered colonic cholinergic sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: Our data suggest that early-life stress, on the background of a genetic predisposition to display an anxiety- and depressive-like phenotype, selectively influences GI function rather than stress-related behaviors. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of genetic predisposition on the outcome of early-life adversity on GI function. SN - 1365-2982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25443141/Early_life_stress_selectively_affects_gastrointestinal_but_not_behavioral_responses_in_a_genetic_model_of_brain_gut_axis_dysfunction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.12486 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -