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Concurrent strength and endurance training exercise sequence does not affect neuromuscular adaptations in older men.
Exp Gerontol. 2014 Dec; 60:207-14.EG

Abstract

Concurrent training is an effective method for increasing skeletal muscle performance in aging individuals, but controversy exists as to whether chronic neuromuscular and functional adaptations are affected by the intra-session exercise sequence. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training exercise sequence on muscular and functional adaptations of older participants. Thirty-six healthy older men not engaged in systematic exercise training programs for at least 6 months were divided into a control group (CON; 65.8±5.3 years), or in the training groups: endurance-strength (ES; 63.2±3.3 years), or strength-endurance (SE; 67.1±6.1 years). Training groups underwent 12 weeks of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training, starting every exercise session with either endurance (in ES) or strength (in SE) exercises. Measurements included knee extension one repetition maximum (1RM), knee extension power, 30 second sit-to-stand test (30SS), maximum vastus lateralis surface electromyographic activity, and rectus femoris echo intensity (RFEI). Significant increases in maximal strength (ES +18±11.3%; SE +14.2±6.0%; p≤0.05), peak power (ES +22.2±19.4%; SE +26.3±31.3%; p≤0.05), and 30SS performance (ES +15.2±7.2%; SE +13.2±11.8%; p≤0.05) were observed only in the training groups, with no differences between ES and SE. Maximum muscular activity was greater after 12weeks at training groups (p≤0.05), and reductions in RFEI were found only in ES and SE (p≤0.05). These results demonstrate that concurrent strength and endurance training performed twice a week effectively increases muscular performance and functional capacity in older men, independent of the intra-session exercise sequence. Additionally, the RFEI decreases indicate an additional adaptation to concurrent training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Centre for Sports Medicine and Human Performance, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UK. Electronic address: euricowilhelm@gmail.com.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25449853

Citation

Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor, et al. "Concurrent Strength and Endurance Training Exercise Sequence Does Not Affect Neuromuscular Adaptations in Older Men." Experimental Gerontology, vol. 60, 2014, pp. 207-14.
Wilhelm EN, Rech A, Minozzo F, et al. Concurrent strength and endurance training exercise sequence does not affect neuromuscular adaptations in older men. Exp Gerontol. 2014;60:207-14.
Wilhelm, E. N., Rech, A., Minozzo, F., Botton, C. E., Radaelli, R., Teixeira, B. C., Reischak-Oliveira, A., & Pinto, R. S. (2014). Concurrent strength and endurance training exercise sequence does not affect neuromuscular adaptations in older men. Experimental Gerontology, 60, 207-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2014.11.007
Wilhelm EN, et al. Concurrent Strength and Endurance Training Exercise Sequence Does Not Affect Neuromuscular Adaptations in Older Men. Exp Gerontol. 2014;60:207-14. PubMed PMID: 25449853.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concurrent strength and endurance training exercise sequence does not affect neuromuscular adaptations in older men. AU - Wilhelm,Eurico Nestor, AU - Rech,Anderson, AU - Minozzo,Felipe, AU - Botton,Cintia Ehlers, AU - Radaelli,Regis, AU - Teixeira,Bruno Costa, AU - Reischak-Oliveira,Alvaro, AU - Pinto,Ronei Silveira, Y1 - 2014/11/13/ PY - 2014/06/16/received PY - 2014/11/06/revised PY - 2014/11/11/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/8/20/medline KW - Aging KW - Electromyography KW - Functional capacity KW - Muscular echo intensity KW - Muscular power KW - Muscular strength SP - 207 EP - 14 JF - Experimental gerontology JO - Exp Gerontol VL - 60 N2 - Concurrent training is an effective method for increasing skeletal muscle performance in aging individuals, but controversy exists as to whether chronic neuromuscular and functional adaptations are affected by the intra-session exercise sequence. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training exercise sequence on muscular and functional adaptations of older participants. Thirty-six healthy older men not engaged in systematic exercise training programs for at least 6 months were divided into a control group (CON; 65.8±5.3 years), or in the training groups: endurance-strength (ES; 63.2±3.3 years), or strength-endurance (SE; 67.1±6.1 years). Training groups underwent 12 weeks of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training, starting every exercise session with either endurance (in ES) or strength (in SE) exercises. Measurements included knee extension one repetition maximum (1RM), knee extension power, 30 second sit-to-stand test (30SS), maximum vastus lateralis surface electromyographic activity, and rectus femoris echo intensity (RFEI). Significant increases in maximal strength (ES +18±11.3%; SE +14.2±6.0%; p≤0.05), peak power (ES +22.2±19.4%; SE +26.3±31.3%; p≤0.05), and 30SS performance (ES +15.2±7.2%; SE +13.2±11.8%; p≤0.05) were observed only in the training groups, with no differences between ES and SE. Maximum muscular activity was greater after 12weeks at training groups (p≤0.05), and reductions in RFEI were found only in ES and SE (p≤0.05). These results demonstrate that concurrent strength and endurance training performed twice a week effectively increases muscular performance and functional capacity in older men, independent of the intra-session exercise sequence. Additionally, the RFEI decreases indicate an additional adaptation to concurrent training. SN - 1873-6815 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25449853/Concurrent_strength_and_endurance_training_exercise_sequence_does_not_affect_neuromuscular_adaptations_in_older_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0531-5565(14)00306-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -