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Association between Australian-Indian mothers' controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits.
Appetite. 2015 Jan; 84:188-95.A

Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined the association between controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits. The secondary aim studied the relationship between controlling feeding practices and two proxy indicators of diet quality. Participants were 203 Australian-Indian mothers with children aged 1-5 years. Controlling feeding practices (pressure to eat, restriction, monitoring) and children's appetite traits (food approach traits: food responsiveness, enjoyment of food, desire to drink, emotional overeating; food avoidance traits: satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, fussiness and emotional undereating) were measured using self-reported, previously validated scales/questionnaires. Children's daily frequency of consumption of core and non-core foods was estimated using a 49-item list of foods eaten (yes/no) in the previous 24 hours as an indicator of diet quality. Higher pressure to eat was associated with higher scores for satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, fussiness and lower score for enjoyment of food. Higher restriction was related to higher scores for food responsiveness and emotional overeating. Higher monitoring was inversely associated with fussiness, slowness in eating, food responsiveness and emotional overeating and positively associated with enjoyment of food. Pressure to eat and monitoring were related to lower number of core and non-core foods consumed in the previous 24 hours, respectively. All associations remained significant after adjusting for maternal and child covariates (n = 152 due to missing data). In conclusion, pressure to eat was associated with higher food avoidance traits and lower consumption of core foods. Restrictive feeding practices were associated with higher food approach traits. In contrast, monitoring practices were related to lower food avoidance and food approach traits and lower non-core food consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.The Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: kimberley.mallan@qut.edu.au.School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25451580

Citation

Jani, Rati, et al. "Association Between Australian-Indian Mothers' Controlling Feeding Practices and Children's Appetite Traits." Appetite, vol. 84, 2015, pp. 188-95.
Jani R, Mallan KM, Daniels L. Association between Australian-Indian mothers' controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits. Appetite. 2015;84:188-95.
Jani, R., Mallan, K. M., & Daniels, L. (2015). Association between Australian-Indian mothers' controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits. Appetite, 84, 188-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.10.020
Jani R, Mallan KM, Daniels L. Association Between Australian-Indian Mothers' Controlling Feeding Practices and Children's Appetite Traits. Appetite. 2015;84:188-95. PubMed PMID: 25451580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Australian-Indian mothers' controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits. AU - Jani,Rati, AU - Mallan,Kimberley M, AU - Daniels,Lynne, Y1 - 2014/10/22/ PY - 2014/08/03/received PY - 2014/10/19/revised PY - 2014/10/20/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/8/1/medline KW - Appetite traits KW - Australia KW - Children KW - Feeding practices KW - Indian SP - 188 EP - 95 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 84 N2 - This cross-sectional study examined the association between controlling feeding practices and children's appetite traits. The secondary aim studied the relationship between controlling feeding practices and two proxy indicators of diet quality. Participants were 203 Australian-Indian mothers with children aged 1-5 years. Controlling feeding practices (pressure to eat, restriction, monitoring) and children's appetite traits (food approach traits: food responsiveness, enjoyment of food, desire to drink, emotional overeating; food avoidance traits: satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, fussiness and emotional undereating) were measured using self-reported, previously validated scales/questionnaires. Children's daily frequency of consumption of core and non-core foods was estimated using a 49-item list of foods eaten (yes/no) in the previous 24 hours as an indicator of diet quality. Higher pressure to eat was associated with higher scores for satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, fussiness and lower score for enjoyment of food. Higher restriction was related to higher scores for food responsiveness and emotional overeating. Higher monitoring was inversely associated with fussiness, slowness in eating, food responsiveness and emotional overeating and positively associated with enjoyment of food. Pressure to eat and monitoring were related to lower number of core and non-core foods consumed in the previous 24 hours, respectively. All associations remained significant after adjusting for maternal and child covariates (n = 152 due to missing data). In conclusion, pressure to eat was associated with higher food avoidance traits and lower consumption of core foods. Restrictive feeding practices were associated with higher food approach traits. In contrast, monitoring practices were related to lower food avoidance and food approach traits and lower non-core food consumption. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25451580/Association_between_Australian_Indian_mothers'_controlling_feeding_practices_and_children's_appetite_traits_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(14)00500-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -