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Composition of fatty acids in virgin olive oils from cross breeding segregating populations by gas chromatography separation with flame ionization detection.
J Sci Food Agric. 2015 Nov; 95(14):2892-900.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent technological advances to improve the quality of virgin olive oil (VOO) have been focused on olive breeding programs by selecting outstanding cultivars and target progenies. Fatty acid (FA) composition, with special emphasis on oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitic acid (C16:0), is one of the most critical quality factors to be evaluated in VOO. For this reason, the profile of FAs is frequently used as a decision tool in olive breeding programs.

RESULTS

A method based on gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to study the influence of genotype on the concentration of ten of the most important FAs in VOOs from target crosses Arbequina × Arbosana, Picual × Koroneiki and Sikitita × Arbosana and their corresponding genitors Arbequina, Arbosana, Koroneiki, Picual and Sikitita. For this purpose, a targeted approach was selected for determination of esterified FAs (EFAs) and non-esterified FAs (NEFAs) in a dual analysis by the same chromatographic method. A Pearson analysis revealed correlations between pairs of FAs, which allowed detecting metabolic connections through desaturation and elongation enzymes. An ANOVA test (with P < 0.01) led to identification of C16:0 EFA, C16:1 EFA and C18:1 EFA and also C16:1 NEFA and C18:0 NEFA as the FAs more influenced by cross breeding. Statistical analysis was carried out by unsupervised analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to look for variability sources.

CONCLUSION

Crosses with a common genitor (Arbequina × Arbosana and Sikitita × Arbosana) were partially overlapped in the PCAs using the profile of FAs. The CA results revealed clear differences between Sikitita × Arbosana and Picual × Koroneiki crosses in the composition of the most significant FAs, while Arbequina × Arbosana was not properly discriminated from the other crosses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Annex C-3, Campus of Rabanales, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. University of Córdoba Agroalimentary Excellence Campus, ceiA3, Córdoba, Spain. Institute of Biomedical Research Maimónides (IMIBIC), Reina Sofía Hospital, University of Córdoba, E-14071, Córdoba, Spain.Lebanese Agricultural Research Institute, Tal Amara, Lebanon.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Annex C-3, Campus of Rabanales, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. University of Córdoba Agroalimentary Excellence Campus, ceiA3, Córdoba, Spain. Institute of Biomedical Research Maimónides (IMIBIC), Reina Sofía Hospital, University of Córdoba, E-14071, Córdoba, Spain.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Annex C-3, Campus of Rabanales, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. University of Córdoba Agroalimentary Excellence Campus, ceiA3, Córdoba, Spain. Institute of Biomedical Research Maimónides (IMIBIC), Reina Sofía Hospital, University of Córdoba, E-14071, Córdoba, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25452231

Citation

Sánchez de Medina, Verónica, et al. "Composition of Fatty Acids in Virgin Olive Oils From Cross Breeding Segregating Populations By Gas Chromatography Separation With Flame Ionization Detection." Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 95, no. 14, 2015, pp. 2892-900.
Sánchez de Medina V, El Riachy M, Priego-Capote F, et al. Composition of fatty acids in virgin olive oils from cross breeding segregating populations by gas chromatography separation with flame ionization detection. J Sci Food Agric. 2015;95(14):2892-900.
Sánchez de Medina, V., El Riachy, M., Priego-Capote, F., & Luque de Castro, M. D. (2015). Composition of fatty acids in virgin olive oils from cross breeding segregating populations by gas chromatography separation with flame ionization detection. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 95(14), 2892-900. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.7030
Sánchez de Medina V, et al. Composition of Fatty Acids in Virgin Olive Oils From Cross Breeding Segregating Populations By Gas Chromatography Separation With Flame Ionization Detection. J Sci Food Agric. 2015;95(14):2892-900. PubMed PMID: 25452231.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Composition of fatty acids in virgin olive oils from cross breeding segregating populations by gas chromatography separation with flame ionization detection. AU - Sánchez de Medina,Verónica, AU - El Riachy,Milad, AU - Priego-Capote,Feliciano, AU - Luque de Castro,María Dolores, Y1 - 2014/12/30/ PY - 2014/06/17/received PY - 2014/11/26/revised PY - 2014/11/26/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2016/7/12/medline KW - GC-FID KW - cross breeding KW - fatty acids KW - genotype KW - olive fruits KW - segregating population KW - virgin olive oil SP - 2892 EP - 900 JF - Journal of the science of food and agriculture JO - J Sci Food Agric VL - 95 IS - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent technological advances to improve the quality of virgin olive oil (VOO) have been focused on olive breeding programs by selecting outstanding cultivars and target progenies. Fatty acid (FA) composition, with special emphasis on oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitic acid (C16:0), is one of the most critical quality factors to be evaluated in VOO. For this reason, the profile of FAs is frequently used as a decision tool in olive breeding programs. RESULTS: A method based on gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to study the influence of genotype on the concentration of ten of the most important FAs in VOOs from target crosses Arbequina × Arbosana, Picual × Koroneiki and Sikitita × Arbosana and their corresponding genitors Arbequina, Arbosana, Koroneiki, Picual and Sikitita. For this purpose, a targeted approach was selected for determination of esterified FAs (EFAs) and non-esterified FAs (NEFAs) in a dual analysis by the same chromatographic method. A Pearson analysis revealed correlations between pairs of FAs, which allowed detecting metabolic connections through desaturation and elongation enzymes. An ANOVA test (with P < 0.01) led to identification of C16:0 EFA, C16:1 EFA and C18:1 EFA and also C16:1 NEFA and C18:0 NEFA as the FAs more influenced by cross breeding. Statistical analysis was carried out by unsupervised analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to look for variability sources. CONCLUSION: Crosses with a common genitor (Arbequina × Arbosana and Sikitita × Arbosana) were partially overlapped in the PCAs using the profile of FAs. The CA results revealed clear differences between Sikitita × Arbosana and Picual × Koroneiki crosses in the composition of the most significant FAs, while Arbequina × Arbosana was not properly discriminated from the other crosses. SN - 1097-0010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25452231/Composition_of_fatty_acids_in_virgin_olive_oils_from_cross_breeding_segregating_populations_by_gas_chromatography_separation_with_flame_ionization_detection_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -