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Influence of maternal depression on household food insecurity for low-income families.
Acad Pediatr. 2015 May-Jun; 15(3):305-10.APed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether maternal depression predicts future household food insecurity for low-income families.

METHODS

This was a secondary data analysis using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). The study cohort consisted of 2917 low-income mothers, defined as <185% federal poverty level, who were food secure at baseline. Maternal data collected when children were 9 and 24 months of age were used. Data at 9 months were considered baseline, and data at 24 months were considered follow-up. Baseline maternal depressive symptoms were measured by a 12-item abbreviated version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Household food insecurity at follow-up was measured by the US Department of Agriculture Household Food Security Scale.

RESULTS

At baseline, 16% of mothers were depressed (raw score >9). Most mothers were white, unemployed, and born in the United States. The majority received Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) (86%); 39% received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). At follow-up, 11.8% of mothers reported household food insecurity. In multivariable analysis, maternal depression at baseline was significantly associated with food insecurity at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio 1.50; 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.12).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that maternal depression is an independent risk factor for household food insecurity in low-income families with young children. Multidisciplinary interventions embedded within and outside the pediatric medical home should be developed to identify depressed mothers and link them to community-based mental health and food resources. Further longitudinal and interventional studies are needed to understand and address the complex relationship between poverty, maternal depression, social safety nets, and food insecurity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: arvin.garg@bmc.org.Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Mass.Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Mass.Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Mass.Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Mass.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25454368

Citation

Garg, Arvin, et al. "Influence of Maternal Depression On Household Food Insecurity for Low-income Families." Academic Pediatrics, vol. 15, no. 3, 2015, pp. 305-10.
Garg A, Toy S, Tripodis Y, et al. Influence of maternal depression on household food insecurity for low-income families. Acad Pediatr. 2015;15(3):305-10.
Garg, A., Toy, S., Tripodis, Y., Cook, J., & Cordella, N. (2015). Influence of maternal depression on household food insecurity for low-income families. Academic Pediatrics, 15(3), 305-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2014.10.002
Garg A, et al. Influence of Maternal Depression On Household Food Insecurity for Low-income Families. Acad Pediatr. 2015 May-Jun;15(3):305-10. PubMed PMID: 25454368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of maternal depression on household food insecurity for low-income families. AU - Garg,Arvin, AU - Toy,Sarah, AU - Tripodis,Yorghos, AU - Cook,John, AU - Cordella,Nick, Y1 - 2014/11/12/ PY - 2014/01/10/received PY - 2014/10/03/revised PY - 2014/10/05/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - WIC KW - food insecurity KW - low income KW - maternal depression SP - 305 EP - 10 JF - Academic pediatrics JO - Acad Pediatr VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether maternal depression predicts future household food insecurity for low-income families. METHODS: This was a secondary data analysis using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). The study cohort consisted of 2917 low-income mothers, defined as <185% federal poverty level, who were food secure at baseline. Maternal data collected when children were 9 and 24 months of age were used. Data at 9 months were considered baseline, and data at 24 months were considered follow-up. Baseline maternal depressive symptoms were measured by a 12-item abbreviated version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Household food insecurity at follow-up was measured by the US Department of Agriculture Household Food Security Scale. RESULTS: At baseline, 16% of mothers were depressed (raw score >9). Most mothers were white, unemployed, and born in the United States. The majority received Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) (86%); 39% received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). At follow-up, 11.8% of mothers reported household food insecurity. In multivariable analysis, maternal depression at baseline was significantly associated with food insecurity at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio 1.50; 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.12). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that maternal depression is an independent risk factor for household food insecurity in low-income families with young children. Multidisciplinary interventions embedded within and outside the pediatric medical home should be developed to identify depressed mothers and link them to community-based mental health and food resources. Further longitudinal and interventional studies are needed to understand and address the complex relationship between poverty, maternal depression, social safety nets, and food insecurity. SN - 1876-2867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25454368/Influence_of_maternal_depression_on_household_food_insecurity_for_low_income_families_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1876-2859(14)00378-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -