Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

People with tuberculosis are associated with a subsequent risk of depression.
Eur J Intern Med. 2014 Dec; 25(10):936-40.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is some evidence that the prevalence of depression in patients with tuberculosis (TB) is higher than those in the general population. However, the incidence of depression after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains unknown. Our aim was to assess the association between TB and the subsequent risk of depression.

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) system of Taiwan. The TB cohort included 9020 patients who were newly diagnosed and recruited between 2000 and 2010. Each patient was randomly frequency-matched for age, sex and the year of index date with four people without TB from the general population. The newly diagnosed depression was followed up until the end of 2011. The relative risks of depression were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models after adjusting for age, sex, index year and comorbidities.

RESULTS

The overall incidence rate of depression was 1.54-fold higher in the TB cohort as compared with the controlled cohort (8.15 vs. 5.29 per 1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.45-1.64). Stratified analyses by gender, age group, monthly income and comorbidities revealed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of depression was higher in males as well as individuals older than 65 years with a low monthly income and comorbidities.

CONCLUSION

People who have been diagnosed with TB have a significantly higher risk of developing depression compared with those in the general population. We should pay more attention to this group of individuals and ensure that they are offered appropriate support.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chu Shang Show Chwan Hospital, Nantou 557, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, Chu Shang Show Chwan Hospital, Nantou 557, Taiwan.Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan. Electronic address: chesttu@gmail.com.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan.Department of Health Risk Management, College of Management, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan. Electronic address: cjchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25459212

Citation

Shen, Te-Chun, et al. "People With Tuberculosis Are Associated With a Subsequent Risk of Depression." European Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 25, no. 10, 2014, pp. 936-40.
Shen TC, Wang CY, Lin CL, et al. People with tuberculosis are associated with a subsequent risk of depression. Eur J Intern Med. 2014;25(10):936-40.
Shen, T. C., Wang, C. Y., Lin, C. L., Liao, W. C., Chen, C. H., Tu, C. Y., Hsia, T. C., Shih, C. M., Hsu, W. H., & Chung, C. J. (2014). People with tuberculosis are associated with a subsequent risk of depression. European Journal of Internal Medicine, 25(10), 936-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2014.10.006
Shen TC, et al. People With Tuberculosis Are Associated With a Subsequent Risk of Depression. Eur J Intern Med. 2014;25(10):936-40. PubMed PMID: 25459212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - People with tuberculosis are associated with a subsequent risk of depression. AU - Shen,Te-Chun, AU - Wang,Chien-Yu, AU - Lin,Cheng-Li, AU - Liao,Wei-Chih, AU - Chen,Chia-Hung, AU - Tu,Chih-Yen, AU - Hsia,Te-Chun, AU - Shih,Chuen-Ming, AU - Hsu,Wu-Huei, AU - Chung,Chi-Jung, Y1 - 2014/10/30/ PY - 2014/04/19/received PY - 2014/10/02/revised PY - 2014/10/04/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/8/19/medline KW - Depression KW - Epidemiology KW - Mycobacterium tuberculosis KW - Tuberculosis (TB) SP - 936 EP - 40 JF - European journal of internal medicine JO - Eur J Intern Med VL - 25 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that the prevalence of depression in patients with tuberculosis (TB) is higher than those in the general population. However, the incidence of depression after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains unknown. Our aim was to assess the association between TB and the subsequent risk of depression. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) system of Taiwan. The TB cohort included 9020 patients who were newly diagnosed and recruited between 2000 and 2010. Each patient was randomly frequency-matched for age, sex and the year of index date with four people without TB from the general population. The newly diagnosed depression was followed up until the end of 2011. The relative risks of depression were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models after adjusting for age, sex, index year and comorbidities. RESULTS: The overall incidence rate of depression was 1.54-fold higher in the TB cohort as compared with the controlled cohort (8.15 vs. 5.29 per 1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.45-1.64). Stratified analyses by gender, age group, monthly income and comorbidities revealed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of depression was higher in males as well as individuals older than 65 years with a low monthly income and comorbidities. CONCLUSION: People who have been diagnosed with TB have a significantly higher risk of developing depression compared with those in the general population. We should pay more attention to this group of individuals and ensure that they are offered appropriate support. SN - 1879-0828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25459212/People_with_tuberculosis_are_associated_with_a_subsequent_risk_of_depression_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0953-6205(14)00288-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -