Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA).
Environ Res 2015; 136:318-23ER

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Lead has long been recognized as a harmful environmental pollutant. People in developing countries like Bangladesh still have a higher risk of lead exposure. Previous research has suggested that the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) genotype can modify lead toxicity and individual susceptibility. As children are more susceptible to lead-induced toxicity, this study investigated whether the ALAD genotype influenced urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA) among children exposed to environmental lead in Bangladesh.

METHODS

Subjects were elementary schoolchildren from a semi-urban industrialized area in Bangladesh. A total of 222 children were studied. Blood and urine were collected to determine ALAD genotypes, blood lead levels and urinary aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA).

RESULTS

The mean BPb level was 9.7 µg/dl for the study children. BPb was significantly positively correlated with hemoglobin (p<0.01). In total, allele frequency for ALAD 1 and 2 was 0.83 and 0.17 respectively. The mean U-ALA concentration was lower in ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers than ALAD1-1 carriers for boys (p=0.001). But for girls, U-ALA did not differ significantly by genotype (p=0.26). When U-ALA was compared by genotype at the same exposure level in a multiple linear regression analysis, boys who were ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers still had a lower level of U-ALA compared to ALAD1-1 carriers.

CONCLUSION

This study provides information about the influence of ALAD polymorphism and its association with U-ALA in Bangladeshi children. Our results indicate that the ALAD1-2/2-2 genotype may have a protective effect in terms of U-ALA for environmentally lead exposed boys.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. Electronic address: rimzim1612@yahoo.com.Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Bangladesh Institute of Health Sciences, 125/1, Darus Salam, Mirpur, Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh.Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh, 77 Satmasjid Road, Dhanmondi, Dhaka 1205, Bangladesh.Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25460652

Citation

Tasmin, Saira, et al. "Delta-aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) Polymorphism in Lead Exposed Bangladeshi Children and Its Effect On Urinary Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA)." Environmental Research, vol. 136, 2015, pp. 318-23.
Tasmin S, Furusawa H, Ahmad SA, et al. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Environ Res. 2015;136:318-23.
Tasmin, S., Furusawa, H., Ahmad, S. A., Faruquee, M. H., & Watanabe, C. (2015). Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Environmental Research, 136, pp. 318-23. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2014.08.045.
Tasmin S, et al. Delta-aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) Polymorphism in Lead Exposed Bangladeshi Children and Its Effect On Urinary Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA). Environ Res. 2015;136:318-23. PubMed PMID: 25460652.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA). AU - Tasmin,Saira, AU - Furusawa,Hana, AU - Ahmad,Sk Akhtar, AU - Faruquee,M H, AU - Watanabe,Chiho, Y1 - 2014/11/25/ PY - 2014/04/03/received PY - 2014/08/16/revised PY - 2014/08/20/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/2/3/medline KW - ALAD polymorphism KW - Bangladesh KW - Blood lead level KW - Children KW - Urinary ALA SP - 318 EP - 23 JF - Environmental research JO - Environ. Res. VL - 136 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Lead has long been recognized as a harmful environmental pollutant. People in developing countries like Bangladesh still have a higher risk of lead exposure. Previous research has suggested that the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) genotype can modify lead toxicity and individual susceptibility. As children are more susceptible to lead-induced toxicity, this study investigated whether the ALAD genotype influenced urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA) among children exposed to environmental lead in Bangladesh. METHODS: Subjects were elementary schoolchildren from a semi-urban industrialized area in Bangladesh. A total of 222 children were studied. Blood and urine were collected to determine ALAD genotypes, blood lead levels and urinary aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA). RESULTS: The mean BPb level was 9.7 µg/dl for the study children. BPb was significantly positively correlated with hemoglobin (p<0.01). In total, allele frequency for ALAD 1 and 2 was 0.83 and 0.17 respectively. The mean U-ALA concentration was lower in ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers than ALAD1-1 carriers for boys (p=0.001). But for girls, U-ALA did not differ significantly by genotype (p=0.26). When U-ALA was compared by genotype at the same exposure level in a multiple linear regression analysis, boys who were ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers still had a lower level of U-ALA compared to ALAD1-1 carriers. CONCLUSION: This study provides information about the influence of ALAD polymorphism and its association with U-ALA in Bangladeshi children. Our results indicate that the ALAD1-2/2-2 genotype may have a protective effect in terms of U-ALA for environmentally lead exposed boys. SN - 1096-0953 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25460652/Delta_aminolevulinic_acid_dehydratase__ALAD__polymorphism_in_lead_exposed_Bangladeshi_children_and_its_effect_on_urinary_aminolevulinic_acid__ALA__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0013-9351(14)00365-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -