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The music of language: an ERP investigation of the effects of musical training on emotional prosody processing.
Brain Lang. 2015 Jan; 140:24-34.BL

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated the positive effects of musical training on the perception of vocally expressed emotion. This study investigated the effects of musical training on event-related potential (ERP) correlates of emotional prosody processing. Fourteen musicians and fourteen control subjects listened to 228 sentences with neutral semantic content, differing in prosody (one third with neutral, one third with happy and one third with angry intonation), with intelligible semantic content (semantic content condition--SCC) and unintelligible semantic content (pure prosody condition--PPC). Reduced P50 amplitude was found in musicians. A difference between SCC and PPC conditions was found in P50 and N100 amplitude in non-musicians only, and in P200 amplitude in musicians only. Furthermore, musicians were more accurate in recognizing angry prosody in PPC sentences. These findings suggest that auditory expertise characterizing extensive musical training may impact different stages of vocal emotional processing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CIPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: ana.pinheiro@psi.uminho.pt.Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CIPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CIPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.Music Department, Institute of Arts and Human Sciences, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CIPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; Spaulding Center of Neuromodulation, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25461917

Citation

Pinheiro, Ana P., et al. "The Music of Language: an ERP Investigation of the Effects of Musical Training On Emotional Prosody Processing." Brain and Language, vol. 140, 2015, pp. 24-34.
Pinheiro AP, Vasconcelos M, Dias M, et al. The music of language: an ERP investigation of the effects of musical training on emotional prosody processing. Brain Lang. 2015;140:24-34.
Pinheiro, A. P., Vasconcelos, M., Dias, M., Arrais, N., & Gonçalves, Ó. F. (2015). The music of language: an ERP investigation of the effects of musical training on emotional prosody processing. Brain and Language, 140, 24-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2014.10.009
Pinheiro AP, et al. The Music of Language: an ERP Investigation of the Effects of Musical Training On Emotional Prosody Processing. Brain Lang. 2015;140:24-34. PubMed PMID: 25461917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The music of language: an ERP investigation of the effects of musical training on emotional prosody processing. AU - Pinheiro,Ana P, AU - Vasconcelos,Margarida, AU - Dias,Marcelo, AU - Arrais,Nuno, AU - Gonçalves,Óscar F, Y1 - 2014/11/21/ PY - 2014/03/04/received PY - 2014/09/30/revised PY - 2014/10/22/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/3/19/medline KW - Emotional prosody KW - Event-related potentials KW - Language KW - Musical training SP - 24 EP - 34 JF - Brain and language JO - Brain Lang VL - 140 N2 - Recent studies have demonstrated the positive effects of musical training on the perception of vocally expressed emotion. This study investigated the effects of musical training on event-related potential (ERP) correlates of emotional prosody processing. Fourteen musicians and fourteen control subjects listened to 228 sentences with neutral semantic content, differing in prosody (one third with neutral, one third with happy and one third with angry intonation), with intelligible semantic content (semantic content condition--SCC) and unintelligible semantic content (pure prosody condition--PPC). Reduced P50 amplitude was found in musicians. A difference between SCC and PPC conditions was found in P50 and N100 amplitude in non-musicians only, and in P200 amplitude in musicians only. Furthermore, musicians were more accurate in recognizing angry prosody in PPC sentences. These findings suggest that auditory expertise characterizing extensive musical training may impact different stages of vocal emotional processing. SN - 1090-2155 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25461917/The_music_of_language:_an_ERP_investigation_of_the_effects_of_musical_training_on_emotional_prosody_processing_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0093-934X(14)00154-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -