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Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine.
Water Res. 2015 Jan 01; 68:510-21.WR

Abstract

This research advances the knowledge of ion-exchange of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprofen (KTP), and naproxen (NPX) - and one analgesic drug-paracetamol (PCM) - by strong-base anion exchange resin (AER) in synthetic ureolyzed urine. Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were fit to experimental equilibrium data using nonlinear least squares method. Favorable ion-exchange was observed for DCF, KTP, and NPX, whereas unfavorable ion-exchange was observed for IBP and PCM. The ion-exchange selectivity of the AER was enhanced by van der Waals interactions between the pharmaceutical and AER as well as the hydrophobicity of the pharmaceutical. For instance, the high selectivity of the AER for DCF was due to the combination of Coulombic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional group of resin and carboxylate functional group of DCF, van der Waals interactions between polystyrene resin matrix and benzene rings of DCF, and possibly hydrogen bonding between dimethylethanol amine functional group side chain and carboxylate and amine functional groups of DCF. Based on analysis of covariance, the presence of multiple pharmaceuticals did not have a significant effect on ion-exchange removal when the NSAIDs were combined in solution. The AER reached saturation of the pharmaceuticals in a continuous-flow column at varying bed volumes following a decreasing order of DCF > NPX ≈ KTP > IBP. Complete regeneration of the column was achieved using a 5% (m/m) NaCl, equal-volume water-methanol solution. Results from multiple treatment and regeneration cycles provide insight into the practical application of pharmaceutical ion-exchange in ureolyzed urine using AER.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure & Environment, University of Florida, PO Box 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450, USA. klandry@ufl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25462757

Citation

Landry, Kelly A., et al. "Ion-exchange Selectivity of Diclofenac, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, and Naproxen in Ureolyzed Human Urine." Water Research, vol. 68, 2015, pp. 510-21.
Landry KA, Sun P, Huang CH, et al. Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine. Water Res. 2015;68:510-21.
Landry, K. A., Sun, P., Huang, C. H., & Boyer, T. H. (2015). Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine. Water Research, 68, 510-21.
Landry KA, et al. Ion-exchange Selectivity of Diclofenac, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, and Naproxen in Ureolyzed Human Urine. Water Res. 2015 Jan 1;68:510-21. PubMed PMID: 25462757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine. AU - Landry,Kelly A, AU - Sun,Peizhe, AU - Huang,Ching-Hua, AU - Boyer,Treavor H, PY - 2014/07/24/received PY - 2014/09/24/revised PY - 2014/09/29/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2016/1/16/medline SP - 510 EP - 21 JF - Water research JO - Water Res. VL - 68 N2 - This research advances the knowledge of ion-exchange of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprofen (KTP), and naproxen (NPX) - and one analgesic drug-paracetamol (PCM) - by strong-base anion exchange resin (AER) in synthetic ureolyzed urine. Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were fit to experimental equilibrium data using nonlinear least squares method. Favorable ion-exchange was observed for DCF, KTP, and NPX, whereas unfavorable ion-exchange was observed for IBP and PCM. The ion-exchange selectivity of the AER was enhanced by van der Waals interactions between the pharmaceutical and AER as well as the hydrophobicity of the pharmaceutical. For instance, the high selectivity of the AER for DCF was due to the combination of Coulombic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional group of resin and carboxylate functional group of DCF, van der Waals interactions between polystyrene resin matrix and benzene rings of DCF, and possibly hydrogen bonding between dimethylethanol amine functional group side chain and carboxylate and amine functional groups of DCF. Based on analysis of covariance, the presence of multiple pharmaceuticals did not have a significant effect on ion-exchange removal when the NSAIDs were combined in solution. The AER reached saturation of the pharmaceuticals in a continuous-flow column at varying bed volumes following a decreasing order of DCF > NPX ≈ KTP > IBP. Complete regeneration of the column was achieved using a 5% (m/m) NaCl, equal-volume water-methanol solution. Results from multiple treatment and regeneration cycles provide insight into the practical application of pharmaceutical ion-exchange in ureolyzed urine using AER. SN - 1879-2448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25462757/Ion_exchange_selectivity_of_diclofenac_ibuprofen_ketoprofen_and_naproxen_in_ureolyzed_human_urine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043-1354(14)00722-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -