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The correlation between the psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio and the severity of peripheral artery disease.
Ann Vasc Surg. 2015 Apr; 29(3):520-5.AV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The measurement of psoas muscle area is a new and potentially useful tool for assessing the frailty of patients in the context of various disease states ranging from cancer to abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Considering the similarity of risk factors for frailty and atherosclerosis, we sought to investigate whether patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have smaller psoas muscle areas in general. Furthermore, we investigated whether PAD symptom severity correlates with psoas muscle size.

METHODS

A chart review was conducted on 146 patients with PAD. Of these patients, 85 (58%) had a computed tomography scan within the last 5 years and were included in the study. Fifty-five patients with AAA and no occlusive disease were included as controls. Cross-sectional areas of the psoas muscles and L4 vertebral body were collected at the mid-L4 level for all patients. Total psoas muscle area was calculated and divided by L4 area to correct for body habitus. Ankle-brachial indices and Rutherford classification were collected as measures of PAD severity. Logistic and multiple regressions were run to assess the difference in psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio between patients with PAD and AAA and within PAD patients, respectively.

RESULTS

PAD patients have a lower psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio controlled for sex and age than patients with AAA (P < 0.05). However, among patients with PAD, psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio does not correlate with severity of symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Using psoas muscle area as a measure of frailty, patients with PAD may be frail as a group. However, the severity of each patient's symptoms does not appear to correlate with the patient's degree of frailty. Prospective studies with larger populations are needed to clarify whether the psoas muscle area has any prognostic value in PAD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.Department of Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. Electronic address: Robert_patterson@brown.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25463328

Citation

Swanson, Sarah, and Robert B. Patterson. "The Correlation Between the Psoas Muscle/vertebral Body Ratio and the Severity of Peripheral Artery Disease." Annals of Vascular Surgery, vol. 29, no. 3, 2015, pp. 520-5.
Swanson S, Patterson RB. The correlation between the psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio and the severity of peripheral artery disease. Ann Vasc Surg. 2015;29(3):520-5.
Swanson, S., & Patterson, R. B. (2015). The correlation between the psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio and the severity of peripheral artery disease. Annals of Vascular Surgery, 29(3), 520-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2014.08.024
Swanson S, Patterson RB. The Correlation Between the Psoas Muscle/vertebral Body Ratio and the Severity of Peripheral Artery Disease. Ann Vasc Surg. 2015;29(3):520-5. PubMed PMID: 25463328.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The correlation between the psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio and the severity of peripheral artery disease. AU - Swanson,Sarah, AU - Patterson,Robert B, Y1 - 2014/11/21/ PY - 2014/05/10/received PY - 2014/07/25/revised PY - 2014/08/30/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/12/19/medline SP - 520 EP - 5 JF - Annals of vascular surgery JO - Ann Vasc Surg VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The measurement of psoas muscle area is a new and potentially useful tool for assessing the frailty of patients in the context of various disease states ranging from cancer to abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Considering the similarity of risk factors for frailty and atherosclerosis, we sought to investigate whether patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have smaller psoas muscle areas in general. Furthermore, we investigated whether PAD symptom severity correlates with psoas muscle size. METHODS: A chart review was conducted on 146 patients with PAD. Of these patients, 85 (58%) had a computed tomography scan within the last 5 years and were included in the study. Fifty-five patients with AAA and no occlusive disease were included as controls. Cross-sectional areas of the psoas muscles and L4 vertebral body were collected at the mid-L4 level for all patients. Total psoas muscle area was calculated and divided by L4 area to correct for body habitus. Ankle-brachial indices and Rutherford classification were collected as measures of PAD severity. Logistic and multiple regressions were run to assess the difference in psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio between patients with PAD and AAA and within PAD patients, respectively. RESULTS: PAD patients have a lower psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio controlled for sex and age than patients with AAA (P < 0.05). However, among patients with PAD, psoas muscle/vertebral body ratio does not correlate with severity of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Using psoas muscle area as a measure of frailty, patients with PAD may be frail as a group. However, the severity of each patient's symptoms does not appear to correlate with the patient's degree of frailty. Prospective studies with larger populations are needed to clarify whether the psoas muscle area has any prognostic value in PAD. SN - 1615-5947 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25463328/The_correlation_between_the_psoas_muscle/vertebral_body_ratio_and_the_severity_of_peripheral_artery_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890-5096(14)00648-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -