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Application of poultry processing industry waste: a strategy for vegetation growth in degraded soil.
Waste Manag. 2015 Feb; 36:316-22.WM

Abstract

The disposal of poultry processing industry waste into the environment without proper care, can cause contamination. Agricultural monitored application is an alternative for disposal, considering its high amount of organic matter and its potential as a soil fertilizer. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of poultry processing industry waste to improve the conditions of a degraded soil from a desertification hotspot, contributing to leguminous tree seedlings growth. The study was carried out under greenhouse conditions in a randomized blocks design and a 4 × 2 factorial scheme with five replicates. The treatments featured four amounts of poultry processing industry waste (D1 = control 0 kg ha(-1); D2 = 1020.41 kg ha(-1); D3 = 2040.82 kg ha(-1); D4 = 4081.63 kg ha(-1)) and two leguminous tree species (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit). The poultry processing industry waste was composed of poultry blood, grease, excrements and substances from the digestive system. Plant height, biomass production, plant nutrient accumulation and soil organic carbon were measured forty days after waste application. Leguminous tree seedlings growth was increased by waste amounts, especially M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth, with height increment of 29.5 cm for the waste amount of 1625 kg ha(-1), and L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit, with maximum height increment of 20 cm for the waste amount of 3814.3 kg ha(-1). M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth had greater initial growth, as well as greater biomass and nutrient accumulation compared with L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. However, belowground biomass was similar between the evaluated species, resulting in higher root/shoot ratio for L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Soil organic carbon did not show significant response to waste amounts, but it did to leguminous tree seedlings growth, especially L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Poultry processing industry waste contributes to leguminous tree seedlings growth, indicating that it can be part of a long-term strategy to increase soil organic carbon in degraded soil from a desertification hotspot.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Federal University of Ceará, Av. Mister Hull 2977, Department of Soil Sciences, Bloco 807, Pici, Fortaleza, CE CEP 60021-970, Brazil.Federal University of Ceará, Av. Mister Hull 2977, Department of Soil Sciences, Bloco 807, Pici, Fortaleza, CE CEP 60021-970, Brazil.Federal University of Ceará, Av. Mister Hull 2977, Department of Soil Sciences, Bloco 807, Pici, Fortaleza, CE CEP 60021-970, Brazil.Federal University of Ceará, Av. Mister Hull 2977, Department of Soil Sciences, Bloco 807, Pici, Fortaleza, CE CEP 60021-970, Brazil. Electronic address: mirian.costa@ufc.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25464939

Citation

do Nascimento, Carla Danielle Vasconcelos, et al. "Application of Poultry Processing Industry Waste: a Strategy for Vegetation Growth in Degraded Soil." Waste Management (New York, N.Y.), vol. 36, 2015, pp. 316-22.
do Nascimento CD, Pontes Filho RA, Artur AG, et al. Application of poultry processing industry waste: a strategy for vegetation growth in degraded soil. Waste Manag. 2015;36:316-22.
do Nascimento, C. D., Pontes Filho, R. A., Artur, A. G., & Costa, M. C. (2015). Application of poultry processing industry waste: a strategy for vegetation growth in degraded soil. Waste Management (New York, N.Y.), 36, 316-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2014.11.001
do Nascimento CD, et al. Application of Poultry Processing Industry Waste: a Strategy for Vegetation Growth in Degraded Soil. Waste Manag. 2015;36:316-22. PubMed PMID: 25464939.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of poultry processing industry waste: a strategy for vegetation growth in degraded soil. AU - do Nascimento,Carla Danielle Vasconcelos, AU - Pontes Filho,Roberto Albuquerque, AU - Artur,Adriana Guirado, AU - Costa,Mirian Cristina Gomes, Y1 - 2014/11/24/ PY - 2014/03/11/received PY - 2014/10/31/revised PY - 2014/11/02/accepted PY - 2014/12/4/entrez PY - 2014/12/4/pubmed PY - 2015/10/2/medline KW - Organic manure KW - Organic waste KW - Semiarid region KW - Soil rehabilitation SP - 316 EP - 22 JF - Waste management (New York, N.Y.) JO - Waste Manag VL - 36 N2 - The disposal of poultry processing industry waste into the environment without proper care, can cause contamination. Agricultural monitored application is an alternative for disposal, considering its high amount of organic matter and its potential as a soil fertilizer. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of poultry processing industry waste to improve the conditions of a degraded soil from a desertification hotspot, contributing to leguminous tree seedlings growth. The study was carried out under greenhouse conditions in a randomized blocks design and a 4 × 2 factorial scheme with five replicates. The treatments featured four amounts of poultry processing industry waste (D1 = control 0 kg ha(-1); D2 = 1020.41 kg ha(-1); D3 = 2040.82 kg ha(-1); D4 = 4081.63 kg ha(-1)) and two leguminous tree species (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit). The poultry processing industry waste was composed of poultry blood, grease, excrements and substances from the digestive system. Plant height, biomass production, plant nutrient accumulation and soil organic carbon were measured forty days after waste application. Leguminous tree seedlings growth was increased by waste amounts, especially M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth, with height increment of 29.5 cm for the waste amount of 1625 kg ha(-1), and L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit, with maximum height increment of 20 cm for the waste amount of 3814.3 kg ha(-1). M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth had greater initial growth, as well as greater biomass and nutrient accumulation compared with L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. However, belowground biomass was similar between the evaluated species, resulting in higher root/shoot ratio for L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Soil organic carbon did not show significant response to waste amounts, but it did to leguminous tree seedlings growth, especially L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Poultry processing industry waste contributes to leguminous tree seedlings growth, indicating that it can be part of a long-term strategy to increase soil organic carbon in degraded soil from a desertification hotspot. SN - 1879-2456 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25464939/Application_of_poultry_processing_industry_waste:_a_strategy_for_vegetation_growth_in_degraded_soil_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -