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Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support.
J Interpers Violence. 2016 Feb; 31(3):383-406.JI

Abstract

The present study examines whether being a victim of violence by an adult in the household, witnessing intra-familial physical violence, and feeling unsafe at school are associated with physical dating violence victimization. It also examines whether extracurricular activity involvement and perceived care by parents, teachers, and friends attenuate those relationships, consistent with a stress-buffering model. Participants were 75,590 ninth-and twelfth-grade students (51% female, 77% White, 24% receiving free/reduced price lunch) who completed the 2010 Minnesota Student Survey. Overall, 8.5% of students reported being victims of dating violence. Significant differences were found by gender, grade, ethnicity, and free/reduced price lunch status. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that being a victim of violence by an adult in the household, witnessing intra-familial physical violence, feeling unsafe at school, and low perceived care by parents were strongly associated with dating violence victimization. Associations of moderate strength were found for low perceived care by teachers and friends. Little to no extracurricular activity involvement was weakly associated with dating violence victimization. Attenuating effects of perceived care and extracurricular activity involvement on associations between risk factors (victimization by a family adult, witnessing intra-familial violence, feeling unsafe at school) and dating violence victimization were smaller in magnitude than main effects. Findings are thus more consistent with an additive model of risk and protective factors in relation to dating violence victimization than a stress-buffering model. Health promotion efforts should attempt to minimize family violence exposure, create safer school environments, and encourage parental involvement and support.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, MN, USA.University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, MN, USA ssbrady@umn.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25466981

Citation

Earnest, Alicia A., and Sonya S. Brady. "Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 31, no. 3, 2016, pp. 383-406.
Earnest AA, Brady SS. Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support. J Interpers Violence. 2016;31(3):383-406.
Earnest, A. A., & Brady, S. S. (2016). Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 31(3), 383-406. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260514555863
Earnest AA, Brady SS. Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support. J Interpers Violence. 2016;31(3):383-406. PubMed PMID: 25466981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students in Minnesota: Associations With Family Violence, Unsafe Schools, and Resources for Support. AU - Earnest,Alicia A, AU - Brady,Sonya S, Y1 - 2014/12/01/ PY - 2014/12/4/entrez PY - 2014/12/4/pubmed PY - 2016/9/30/medline KW - adolescents KW - dating violence KW - school safety KW - social support KW - victimization SP - 383 EP - 406 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 31 IS - 3 N2 - The present study examines whether being a victim of violence by an adult in the household, witnessing intra-familial physical violence, and feeling unsafe at school are associated with physical dating violence victimization. It also examines whether extracurricular activity involvement and perceived care by parents, teachers, and friends attenuate those relationships, consistent with a stress-buffering model. Participants were 75,590 ninth-and twelfth-grade students (51% female, 77% White, 24% receiving free/reduced price lunch) who completed the 2010 Minnesota Student Survey. Overall, 8.5% of students reported being victims of dating violence. Significant differences were found by gender, grade, ethnicity, and free/reduced price lunch status. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that being a victim of violence by an adult in the household, witnessing intra-familial physical violence, feeling unsafe at school, and low perceived care by parents were strongly associated with dating violence victimization. Associations of moderate strength were found for low perceived care by teachers and friends. Little to no extracurricular activity involvement was weakly associated with dating violence victimization. Attenuating effects of perceived care and extracurricular activity involvement on associations between risk factors (victimization by a family adult, witnessing intra-familial violence, feeling unsafe at school) and dating violence victimization were smaller in magnitude than main effects. Findings are thus more consistent with an additive model of risk and protective factors in relation to dating violence victimization than a stress-buffering model. Health promotion efforts should attempt to minimize family violence exposure, create safer school environments, and encourage parental involvement and support. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25466981/Dating_Violence_Victimization_Among_High_School_Students_in_Minnesota:_Associations_With_Family_Violence_Unsafe_Schools_and_Resources_for_Support_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260514555863?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -