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Effect of domestic cooking on carotenoids, tocopherols, fatty acids, phenolics, and antioxidant activities of lentils (Lens culinaris).
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Dec 31; 62(52):12585-94.JA

Abstract

The phytochemicals and antioxidant activity in lipophilic and hydrophilic (extractable and bound) fractions of lentils before and after domestic cooking were investigated. The hydrophilic fractions in lentils contributed much more to the antioxidant activity than the lipophilic fraction. The phenolic content of lentils was mainly composed of extractable compounds. Significant changes (P < 0.05) in carotenoid, tocopherol, total phenolic, and condensed tannin contents of both extractable and bound phenolics fractions, as well as in antioxidant activities, were found in lentils before and after cooking. More specifically, cooking was found to favor the release of carotenoids and tocopherols and flavonols (kaempferol glycosides), but led to losses of flavanols (monomeric and condensed tannin). Whereas reduced flavanols and other phenolic compounds may have negatively affected the antioxidant activity, other components, especially the lipophilic antioxidants, were increased. The present study suggests that incorporation of cooked lentils into the diet will not cause significant loss to the phytochemical antioxidants and thus will retain the potential health benefits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University , Nanchang 330047, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25474757

Citation

Zhang, Bing, et al. "Effect of Domestic Cooking On Carotenoids, Tocopherols, Fatty Acids, Phenolics, and Antioxidant Activities of Lentils (Lens Culinaris)." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 62, no. 52, 2014, pp. 12585-94.
Zhang B, Deng Z, Tang Y, et al. Effect of domestic cooking on carotenoids, tocopherols, fatty acids, phenolics, and antioxidant activities of lentils (Lens culinaris). J Agric Food Chem. 2014;62(52):12585-94.
Zhang, B., Deng, Z., Tang, Y., Chen, P. X., Liu, R., Ramdath, D. D., Liu, Q., Hernandez, M., & Tsao, R. (2014). Effect of domestic cooking on carotenoids, tocopherols, fatty acids, phenolics, and antioxidant activities of lentils (Lens culinaris). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(52), 12585-94. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf504181r
Zhang B, et al. Effect of Domestic Cooking On Carotenoids, Tocopherols, Fatty Acids, Phenolics, and Antioxidant Activities of Lentils (Lens Culinaris). J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Dec 31;62(52):12585-94. PubMed PMID: 25474757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of domestic cooking on carotenoids, tocopherols, fatty acids, phenolics, and antioxidant activities of lentils (Lens culinaris). AU - Zhang,Bing, AU - Deng,Zeyuan, AU - Tang,Yao, AU - Chen,Peter X, AU - Liu,Ronghua, AU - Ramdath,D Dan, AU - Liu,Qiang, AU - Hernandez,Marta, AU - Tsao,Rong, Y1 - 2014/12/16/ PY - 2014/12/5/entrez PY - 2014/12/5/pubmed PY - 2015/9/4/medline KW - antioxidant activities KW - domestic cooking KW - lentil KW - lipophilic KW - phenolic SP - 12585 EP - 94 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 62 IS - 52 N2 - The phytochemicals and antioxidant activity in lipophilic and hydrophilic (extractable and bound) fractions of lentils before and after domestic cooking were investigated. The hydrophilic fractions in lentils contributed much more to the antioxidant activity than the lipophilic fraction. The phenolic content of lentils was mainly composed of extractable compounds. Significant changes (P < 0.05) in carotenoid, tocopherol, total phenolic, and condensed tannin contents of both extractable and bound phenolics fractions, as well as in antioxidant activities, were found in lentils before and after cooking. More specifically, cooking was found to favor the release of carotenoids and tocopherols and flavonols (kaempferol glycosides), but led to losses of flavanols (monomeric and condensed tannin). Whereas reduced flavanols and other phenolic compounds may have negatively affected the antioxidant activity, other components, especially the lipophilic antioxidants, were increased. The present study suggests that incorporation of cooked lentils into the diet will not cause significant loss to the phytochemical antioxidants and thus will retain the potential health benefits. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25474757/Effect_of_domestic_cooking_on_carotenoids_tocopherols_fatty_acids_phenolics_and_antioxidant_activities_of_lentils__Lens_culinaris__ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -