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Dairy food intake is positively associated with cardiovascular health: findings from Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study.
Nutr Res 2014; 34(12):1036-44NR

Abstract

Conflicting findings have been reported about dairy food consumption and risk for cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, few studies have examined dairy food intake in relation to cardiovascular health and the incorporation of lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity. This study examined whether dairy food consumption was associated with cardiovascular health, recently defined by the American Heart Association. Data were analyzed from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg survey. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to measure intakes of milk, yogurt, cheese, dairy desserts, ice cream, and butter. Seven cardiovascular health metrics were assessed: smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose. A total cardiovascular health score (CHS) was determined by summing the total number of health metrics at ideal levels. It was hypothesized that greater dairy food consumption (both low fat and whole fat) would be associated with better global cardiovascular health, as indicated by a higher CHS. Total dairy food intake was positively associated with the CHS. Higher intakes of whole fat milk, yogurt, and cheese were associated with better cardiovascular health. Even when controlling for demographic and dietary variables, those who consumed at least 5 servings per week of these dairy products had a significantly higher CHS than those who consumed these products less frequently. Higher total whole fat dairy food intake was also associated with other positive health behaviors, including being a nonsmoker, consuming the suggested dietary intakes of recommended foods, and having a normal body mass index. Increased dairy food consumption was associated with better cardiovascular health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; Centre de Recherche Public Santé, Centre d'Etudes en Santé, Strassen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Electronic address: whige003@mymail.unisa.edu.au.Centre de Recherche Public Santé, Centre d'Etudes en Santé, Strassen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25476191

Citation

Crichton, Georgina E., and Ala'a Alkerwi. "Dairy Food Intake Is Positively Associated With Cardiovascular Health: Findings From Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 34, no. 12, 2014, pp. 1036-44.
Crichton GE, Alkerwi A. Dairy food intake is positively associated with cardiovascular health: findings from Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study. Nutr Res. 2014;34(12):1036-44.
Crichton, G. E., & Alkerwi, A. (2014). Dairy food intake is positively associated with cardiovascular health: findings from Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 34(12), pp. 1036-44. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2014.04.002.
Crichton GE, Alkerwi A. Dairy Food Intake Is Positively Associated With Cardiovascular Health: Findings From Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study. Nutr Res. 2014;34(12):1036-44. PubMed PMID: 25476191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy food intake is positively associated with cardiovascular health: findings from Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study. AU - Crichton,Georgina E, AU - Alkerwi,Ala'a, Y1 - 2014/04/12/ PY - 2013/12/18/received PY - 2014/03/21/revised PY - 2014/04/02/accepted PY - 2014/12/6/entrez PY - 2014/12/6/pubmed PY - 2015/7/29/medline KW - Cardiovascular health KW - Dairy food KW - Diet KW - Milk KW - Yogurt SP - 1036 EP - 44 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 34 IS - 12 N2 - Conflicting findings have been reported about dairy food consumption and risk for cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, few studies have examined dairy food intake in relation to cardiovascular health and the incorporation of lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity. This study examined whether dairy food consumption was associated with cardiovascular health, recently defined by the American Heart Association. Data were analyzed from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg survey. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to measure intakes of milk, yogurt, cheese, dairy desserts, ice cream, and butter. Seven cardiovascular health metrics were assessed: smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose. A total cardiovascular health score (CHS) was determined by summing the total number of health metrics at ideal levels. It was hypothesized that greater dairy food consumption (both low fat and whole fat) would be associated with better global cardiovascular health, as indicated by a higher CHS. Total dairy food intake was positively associated with the CHS. Higher intakes of whole fat milk, yogurt, and cheese were associated with better cardiovascular health. Even when controlling for demographic and dietary variables, those who consumed at least 5 servings per week of these dairy products had a significantly higher CHS than those who consumed these products less frequently. Higher total whole fat dairy food intake was also associated with other positive health behaviors, including being a nonsmoker, consuming the suggested dietary intakes of recommended foods, and having a normal body mass index. Increased dairy food consumption was associated with better cardiovascular health. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25476191/Dairy_food_intake_is_positively_associated_with_cardiovascular_health:_findings_from_Observation_of_Cardiovascular_Risk_Factors_in_Luxembourg_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(14)00049-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -