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Dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.
Cancer Causes Control 2015; 26(2):257-268CC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The findings from epidemiologic studies of dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk have been conflicting. We performed a dose-response meta-analysis of published prospective studies to assess the aforementioned association.

METHODS

Relevant studies that reported the association between the components of dyslipidemia (serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and high-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and colorectal cancer risk were identified by searching PubMed until the end of May 2014. We pooled the relative risks (RRs) from individual studies using a random- and fixed-effects models and performed dose-response, heterogeneity, and publication bias analyses.

RESULTS

Seventeen prospective studies, including 1,987,753 individuals with 10,876 colorectal cancer events, were included in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled RR for high versus low concentrations for triglyceride (n = 9 studies) was 1.18 (95 % CI 1.04-1.34; I (2) = 47.8 %), for total cholesterol (n = 10 studies) was 1.11 (95 % CI 1.01-1.21; I (2) = 46.7 %), for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 6 studies) was 0.84 (95 % CI 0.69-1.02; I (2) = 42.5 %), and for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 3 studies) was 1.04 (95 % CI 0.60-1.81; I (2) = 82.7 %). In the dose-response analysis, the overall pooled RR was 1.01 (95 % CI 1.00-1.03; I (2) = 0 %) per 50 mg/dL of triglyceride and 1.01 (95 % CI 0.97-1.05; I (2) = 64.3 %) per 100 mg/dL of total cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis of prospective studies suggests that dyslipidemia, especially high levels of serum triglyceride and total cholesterol, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol might associate with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine whether altering the concentrations of these metabolic variables may reduce colorectal cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, 36, San Hao Street, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110004, People's Republic of China.Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, 36, San Hao Street, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110004, People's Republic of China. zhongt_sjhospital@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25488827

Citation

Yao, Xu, and Zhong Tian. "Dyslipidemia and Colorectal Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 26, no. 2, 2015, pp. 257-268.
Yao X, Tian Z. Dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(2):257-268.
Yao, X., & Tian, Z. (2015). Dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 26(2), pp. 257-268. doi:10.1007/s10552-014-0507-y.
Yao X, Tian Z. Dyslipidemia and Colorectal Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(2):257-268. PubMed PMID: 25488827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Yao,Xu, AU - Tian,Zhong, Y1 - 2014/12/09/ PY - 2014/08/21/received PY - 2014/11/27/accepted PY - 2014/12/10/entrez PY - 2014/12/10/pubmed PY - 2016/3/30/medline SP - 257 EP - 268 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: The findings from epidemiologic studies of dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk have been conflicting. We performed a dose-response meta-analysis of published prospective studies to assess the aforementioned association. METHODS: Relevant studies that reported the association between the components of dyslipidemia (serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and high-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and colorectal cancer risk were identified by searching PubMed until the end of May 2014. We pooled the relative risks (RRs) from individual studies using a random- and fixed-effects models and performed dose-response, heterogeneity, and publication bias analyses. RESULTS: Seventeen prospective studies, including 1,987,753 individuals with 10,876 colorectal cancer events, were included in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled RR for high versus low concentrations for triglyceride (n = 9 studies) was 1.18 (95 % CI 1.04-1.34; I (2) = 47.8 %), for total cholesterol (n = 10 studies) was 1.11 (95 % CI 1.01-1.21; I (2) = 46.7 %), for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 6 studies) was 0.84 (95 % CI 0.69-1.02; I (2) = 42.5 %), and for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 3 studies) was 1.04 (95 % CI 0.60-1.81; I (2) = 82.7 %). In the dose-response analysis, the overall pooled RR was 1.01 (95 % CI 1.00-1.03; I (2) = 0 %) per 50 mg/dL of triglyceride and 1.01 (95 % CI 0.97-1.05; I (2) = 64.3 %) per 100 mg/dL of total cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of prospective studies suggests that dyslipidemia, especially high levels of serum triglyceride and total cholesterol, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol might associate with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine whether altering the concentrations of these metabolic variables may reduce colorectal cancer risk. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25488827/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-014-0507-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -