Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program.
JSLS. 2014 Oct-Dec; 18(4)JSLS

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module.

METHODS

A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed.

RESULTS

The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET.

CONCLUSION

Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. USA.University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25489213

Citation

Franasiak, Jason, et al. "Feasibility and Acceptance of a Robotic Surgery Ergonomic Training Program." JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, vol. 18, no. 4, 2014.
Franasiak J, Craven R, Mosaly P, et al. Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program. JSLS. 2014;18(4).
Franasiak, J., Craven, R., Mosaly, P., & Gehrig, P. A. (2014). Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program. JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, 18(4). https://doi.org/10.4293/JSLS.2014.00166
Franasiak J, et al. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Robotic Surgery Ergonomic Training Program. JSLS. 2014 Oct-Dec;18(4) PubMed PMID: 25489213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program. AU - Franasiak,Jason, AU - Craven,Renatta, AU - Mosaly,Prithima, AU - Gehrig,Paola A, PY - 2014/12/10/entrez PY - 2014/12/10/pubmed PY - 2016/2/26/medline KW - Ergonomic strain KW - Ergonomic training KW - Robotic surgery KW - Strain JF - JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons JO - JSLS VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module. METHODS: A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET. CONCLUSION: Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery. SN - 1938-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25489213/Feasibility_and_acceptance_of_a_robotic_surgery_ergonomic_training_program_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/25489213/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -