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Influence of dietary fat composition on intestinal absorption in the rat.
Lipids. 1989 Jun; 24(6):494-501.L

Abstract

Omega-3 fatty acids influence the function of the intestinal brush border membrane. For example, the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) has an antiabsorptive effect on jejunal uptake of glucose. This study was undertaken to determine whether the effect of feeding alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3) or EPA plus docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3) on intestinal absorption of nutrients was influenced by the major source of dietary lipid, hydrogenated beef tallow or safflower oil. The in vitro intestinal uptake of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol was examined in rats fed isocaloric diets for 2 weeks: beef tallow, beef tallow + linolenic acid, beef tallow + eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, safflower oil, safflower oil + linolenic acid, or safflower oil + eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid. Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid reduced jejunal uptake of 10 and 20 mM glucose only when fed with beef tallow, and not when fed with safflower oil. Linolenic acid had no effect on glucose uptake, regardless of whether it was fed with beef tallow or safflower oil. The jejunal uptake a long-chain fatty acids (18:0, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3 and 22:6 omega 3) and cholesterol was lower in safflower oil than with beef tallow. When eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid was given with beef tallow (but not with safflower oil), there was lower uptake of 18:0, 20:5 omega 3 and cholesterol. The demonstration of the inhibitory effect of linolenic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid on cholesterol uptake required the feeding of a saturated fatty acid diet (beef tallow).(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2549323

Citation

Thomson, A B., et al. "Influence of Dietary Fat Composition On Intestinal Absorption in the Rat." Lipids, vol. 24, no. 6, 1989, pp. 494-501.
Thomson AB, Keelan M, Garg ML, et al. Influence of dietary fat composition on intestinal absorption in the rat. Lipids. 1989;24(6):494-501.
Thomson, A. B., Keelan, M., Garg, M. L., & Clandinin, M. T. (1989). Influence of dietary fat composition on intestinal absorption in the rat. Lipids, 24(6), 494-501.
Thomson AB, et al. Influence of Dietary Fat Composition On Intestinal Absorption in the Rat. Lipids. 1989;24(6):494-501. PubMed PMID: 2549323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of dietary fat composition on intestinal absorption in the rat. AU - Thomson,A B, AU - Keelan,M, AU - Garg,M L, AU - Clandinin,M T, PY - 1989/6/1/pubmed PY - 1989/6/1/medline PY - 1989/6/1/entrez SP - 494 EP - 501 JF - Lipids JO - Lipids VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - Omega-3 fatty acids influence the function of the intestinal brush border membrane. For example, the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) has an antiabsorptive effect on jejunal uptake of glucose. This study was undertaken to determine whether the effect of feeding alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3) or EPA plus docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3) on intestinal absorption of nutrients was influenced by the major source of dietary lipid, hydrogenated beef tallow or safflower oil. The in vitro intestinal uptake of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol was examined in rats fed isocaloric diets for 2 weeks: beef tallow, beef tallow + linolenic acid, beef tallow + eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, safflower oil, safflower oil + linolenic acid, or safflower oil + eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid. Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid reduced jejunal uptake of 10 and 20 mM glucose only when fed with beef tallow, and not when fed with safflower oil. Linolenic acid had no effect on glucose uptake, regardless of whether it was fed with beef tallow or safflower oil. The jejunal uptake a long-chain fatty acids (18:0, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3 and 22:6 omega 3) and cholesterol was lower in safflower oil than with beef tallow. When eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid was given with beef tallow (but not with safflower oil), there was lower uptake of 18:0, 20:5 omega 3 and cholesterol. The demonstration of the inhibitory effect of linolenic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid on cholesterol uptake required the feeding of a saturated fatty acid diet (beef tallow).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0024-4201 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2549323/Influence_of_dietary_fat_composition_on_intestinal_absorption_in_the_rat_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0024-4201&date=1989&volume=24&issue=6&spage=494 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -