Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sodium-induced hyperhydration decreases urine output and improves fluid balance compared with glycerol- and water-induced hyperhydration.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2015 Jan; 40(1):51-8.AP

Abstract

Before 2010, which is the year the World Anti-Doping Agency banned its use, glycerol was commonly used by athletes for hyperhydration purposes. Through its effect on osmoreceptors, we believe that sodium could prove a viable alternative to glycerol as a hyperhydrating agent. Therefore, this study compared the effects of sodium-induced hyperhydration (SIH), glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) and water-induced hyperhydration (WIH) on fluid balance responses. Using a randomized, double-blind and counterbalanced protocol, 17 men (21 ± 3 years, 64 ± 6 kg fat-free mass (FFM)) underwent three 3-h hyperhydration protocols during which they ingested, over the first 60-min period, 30 mL/kg FFM of water with (i) an artificial sweetener (WIH); (ii) an artificial sweetener + 7.45 g/L of table salt (SIH); or (iii) an artificial sweetener + 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (GIH). Changes in body weight (BW), urine production, fluid retention, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma volume, and perceptual variables were monitored throughout the 3-h trials. After 3 h, SIH was associated with significantly (p < 0.05) lower hemoglobin, hematocrit (SIH: 43.1% ± 2.8%; GIH: 44.9% ± 2.4%), and urine production, as well as greater BW, fluid retention (SIH: 1144 ± 294 mL; GIH: 795 ± 337 mL), and plasma volume (SIH: 11.9% ± 12.0%; GIH: 4.0% ± 6.0%) gains, compared with GIH and WIH. No significant differences in heart rate or abdominal discomfort were observed between treatments. In conclusion, our results indicate that SIH is a superior hyperhydrating technique than, and proves to be a worthwhile alternative to, GIH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Research Centre on Aging, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 4C4, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25494972

Citation

Savoie, Félix A., et al. "Sodium-induced Hyperhydration Decreases Urine Output and Improves Fluid Balance Compared With Glycerol- and Water-induced Hyperhydration." Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, vol. 40, no. 1, 2015, pp. 51-8.
Savoie FA, Dion T, Asselin A, et al. Sodium-induced hyperhydration decreases urine output and improves fluid balance compared with glycerol- and water-induced hyperhydration. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2015;40(1):51-8.
Savoie, F. A., Dion, T., Asselin, A., & Goulet, E. D. (2015). Sodium-induced hyperhydration decreases urine output and improves fluid balance compared with glycerol- and water-induced hyperhydration. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, 40(1), 51-8. https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2014-0243
Savoie FA, et al. Sodium-induced Hyperhydration Decreases Urine Output and Improves Fluid Balance Compared With Glycerol- and Water-induced Hyperhydration. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2015;40(1):51-8. PubMed PMID: 25494972.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sodium-induced hyperhydration decreases urine output and improves fluid balance compared with glycerol- and water-induced hyperhydration. AU - Savoie,Félix A, AU - Dion,Tommy, AU - Asselin,Audrey, AU - Goulet,Eric D B, PY - 2014/12/16/entrez PY - 2014/12/17/pubmed PY - 2016/6/23/medline KW - dehydration KW - déshydratation KW - fluid balance KW - hydratation KW - hydration KW - overhydration KW - sel de table KW - surhydratation KW - table salt KW - équilibre hydrique SP - 51 EP - 8 JF - Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme JO - Appl Physiol Nutr Metab VL - 40 IS - 1 N2 - Before 2010, which is the year the World Anti-Doping Agency banned its use, glycerol was commonly used by athletes for hyperhydration purposes. Through its effect on osmoreceptors, we believe that sodium could prove a viable alternative to glycerol as a hyperhydrating agent. Therefore, this study compared the effects of sodium-induced hyperhydration (SIH), glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) and water-induced hyperhydration (WIH) on fluid balance responses. Using a randomized, double-blind and counterbalanced protocol, 17 men (21 ± 3 years, 64 ± 6 kg fat-free mass (FFM)) underwent three 3-h hyperhydration protocols during which they ingested, over the first 60-min period, 30 mL/kg FFM of water with (i) an artificial sweetener (WIH); (ii) an artificial sweetener + 7.45 g/L of table salt (SIH); or (iii) an artificial sweetener + 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (GIH). Changes in body weight (BW), urine production, fluid retention, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma volume, and perceptual variables were monitored throughout the 3-h trials. After 3 h, SIH was associated with significantly (p < 0.05) lower hemoglobin, hematocrit (SIH: 43.1% ± 2.8%; GIH: 44.9% ± 2.4%), and urine production, as well as greater BW, fluid retention (SIH: 1144 ± 294 mL; GIH: 795 ± 337 mL), and plasma volume (SIH: 11.9% ± 12.0%; GIH: 4.0% ± 6.0%) gains, compared with GIH and WIH. No significant differences in heart rate or abdominal discomfort were observed between treatments. In conclusion, our results indicate that SIH is a superior hyperhydrating technique than, and proves to be a worthwhile alternative to, GIH. SN - 1715-5320 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25494972/Sodium_induced_hyperhydration_decreases_urine_output_and_improves_fluid_balance_compared_with_glycerol__and_water_induced_hyperhydration_ L2 - http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.1139/apnm-2014-0243?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -