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[Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].
Rev Mal Respir. 2014 Dec; 31(10):937-60.RM

Abstract

One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service de pneumologie, centre de lutte antituberculeuse (CLAT 86), unité de tabacologie, CHU de Poitiers, CHU la Milétrie, pavillon René-Beauchant, BP 577, 86021 Poitiers cedex, France. Electronic address: m.underner@chu-poitiers.fr.Dispensaire Émile-Roux, centre de tabacologie, centre de lutte antituberculeuse (CLAT 63), 63100 Clermont-Ferrand, France.Service de pneumologie, consultation de tabacologie - CHR Metz-Thionville, 57038 Metz, France.

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

25496790

Citation

Underner, M, et al. "[Smoking Cessation in Smokers With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease]." Revue Des Maladies Respiratoires, vol. 31, no. 10, 2014, pp. 937-60.
Underner M, Perriot J, Peiffer G. [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease]. Rev Mal Respir. 2014;31(10):937-60.
Underner, M., Perriot, J., & Peiffer, G. (2014). [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease]. Revue Des Maladies Respiratoires, 31(10), 937-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmr.2014.07.001
Underner M, Perriot J, Peiffer G. [Smoking Cessation in Smokers With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease]. Rev Mal Respir. 2014;31(10):937-60. PubMed PMID: 25496790.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease]. AU - Underner,M, AU - Perriot,J, AU - Peiffer,G, Y1 - 2014/08/18/ PY - 2013/07/27/received PY - 2014/04/07/accepted PY - 2014/12/16/entrez PY - 2014/12/17/pubmed PY - 2015/8/28/medline KW - BPCO KW - COPD KW - Dépendance nicotinique KW - Nicotine addiction KW - Risk reduction strategies KW - Réduction du risque KW - Sevrage tabagique KW - Smoking cessation KW - Tabagisme KW - Tobacco smoking SP - 937 EP - 60 JF - Revue des maladies respiratoires JO - Rev Mal Respir VL - 31 IS - 10 N2 - One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications. SN - 1776-2588 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25496790/[Smoking_cessation_in_smokers_with_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0761-8425(14)00318-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -