Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White women.
Womens Health Issues. 2015 Jan-Feb; 25(1):56-62.WH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening exist when comparing foreign-born and U.S.-born women collectively and disaggregated by race and ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the age-adjusted prevalence of not receiving a flu or pneumonia vaccine, clinical breast examination, mammogram or Pap smear among U.S.- and foreign-born White women by region of birth and examine associations while controlling for potential confounders.

METHODS

We pooled 12 years of National Health Interview Survey data (n = 117,893). To approximate an "Arab-American" ethnicity, we identified 15 "Arab" countries from the Middle East region that comprise the Arab Nations. Data was requested from the National Center for Health Statistics Research Data Center. We used the χ(2) statistic to compare descriptive statistics and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were used for inferential statistics.

FINDINGS

Compared to U.S.-born, foreign-born Whites from the Arab Nations had higher estimates of not receiving recommended vaccinations and cancer screenings. In crude and adjusted analyses, foreign-born Arab-American women were less likely to report receiving a flu vaccine (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.21-0.58), pneumonia vaccine (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06-0.32), Pap smear (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.05-0.31), or clinical breast examination (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.07-0.37) compared with U.S.-born White women. There were no differences for mammography.

CONCLUSIONS

This national study examining uptake of flu and pneumonia vaccines and preventive cancer screenings suggests that estimates are lower for foreign-born Arab-American women compared with U.S.-born White women. Future studies should collect qualitative data that assess the cultural context surrounding prevention and screening behaviors among Arab-American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wellness, Health Promotion and Injury Prevention, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan. Electronic address: dallo@oakland.edu.Department of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25498764

Citation

Dallo, Florence J., and Tiffany B. Kindratt. "Disparities in Vaccinations and Cancer Screening Among U.S.- and Foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White Women." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 25, no. 1, 2015, pp. 56-62.
Dallo FJ, Kindratt TB. Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White women. Womens Health Issues. 2015;25(1):56-62.
Dallo, F. J., & Kindratt, T. B. (2015). Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White women. Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 25(1), 56-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2014.10.002
Dallo FJ, Kindratt TB. Disparities in Vaccinations and Cancer Screening Among U.S.- and Foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White Women. Womens Health Issues. 2015 Jan-Feb;25(1):56-62. PubMed PMID: 25498764.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born Arab and European American non-Hispanic White women. AU - Dallo,Florence J, AU - Kindratt,Tiffany B, Y1 - 2014/12/12/ PY - 2014/03/27/received PY - 2014/06/27/revised PY - 2014/10/08/accepted PY - 2014/12/16/entrez PY - 2014/12/17/pubmed PY - 2015/11/4/medline SP - 56 EP - 62 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Disparities in vaccinations and cancer screening exist when comparing foreign-born and U.S.-born women collectively and disaggregated by race and ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the age-adjusted prevalence of not receiving a flu or pneumonia vaccine, clinical breast examination, mammogram or Pap smear among U.S.- and foreign-born White women by region of birth and examine associations while controlling for potential confounders. METHODS: We pooled 12 years of National Health Interview Survey data (n = 117,893). To approximate an "Arab-American" ethnicity, we identified 15 "Arab" countries from the Middle East region that comprise the Arab Nations. Data was requested from the National Center for Health Statistics Research Data Center. We used the χ(2) statistic to compare descriptive statistics and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were used for inferential statistics. FINDINGS: Compared to U.S.-born, foreign-born Whites from the Arab Nations had higher estimates of not receiving recommended vaccinations and cancer screenings. In crude and adjusted analyses, foreign-born Arab-American women were less likely to report receiving a flu vaccine (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.21-0.58), pneumonia vaccine (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06-0.32), Pap smear (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.05-0.31), or clinical breast examination (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.07-0.37) compared with U.S.-born White women. There were no differences for mammography. CONCLUSIONS: This national study examining uptake of flu and pneumonia vaccines and preventive cancer screenings suggests that estimates are lower for foreign-born Arab-American women compared with U.S.-born White women. Future studies should collect qualitative data that assess the cultural context surrounding prevention and screening behaviors among Arab-American women. SN - 1878-4321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25498764/Disparities_in_vaccinations_and_cancer_screening_among_U_S___and_foreign_born_Arab_and_European_American_non_Hispanic_White_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(14)00125-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -