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Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep duration, and childhood overweight: a longitudinal cohort study.
J Pediatr. 2015 Mar; 166(3):632-9.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine independent associations between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), sleep duration from birth through 6.75 years, and body mass index (BMI) through 15 years of age in a population-based cohort.

STUDY DESIGN

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children collected parent questionnaire data on child sleep duration and SDB symptoms from birth through 6.75 years and child BMI from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children research clinics (n = 1899). For SDB, logistic regression models-minimal, confounder, and confounder + sleep duration adjusted-examined associations with BMI at 7, 10, and 15 years of age. For short sleep duration (≤10th percentile), comparable SDB-adjusted models examined associations with BMI at 15 years of age.

RESULTS

Children with the worst SDB symptoms vs asymptomatic children, had increased odds of overweight at 7 (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.04-4.17), 10 (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.02-3.16), and 15 years of age (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.27-3.97) in models adjusted for sleep duration. Similarly, short sleep duration at ≈5-6 years was associated with overweight at 15 years, independent of SDB. Children with short sleep duration at 4.75 years were more likely to be overweight at 15 years in minimally (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.52-3.20), confounder (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.34-2.96), and SDB-adjusted (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.36-3.04) models.

CONCLUSIONS

Both SDB and short sleep duration significantly and independently increase children's odds of becoming overweight. Findings underscore the potential importance of early identification and remediation of SDB, along with insufficient sleep, as strategies for reducing childhood obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Electronic address: Karen.bonuck@einstein.yu.edu.Sleep Disorders Center and Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25499598

Citation

Bonuck, Karen, et al. "Sleep-disordered Breathing, Sleep Duration, and Childhood Overweight: a Longitudinal Cohort Study." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 166, no. 3, 2015, pp. 632-9.
Bonuck K, Chervin RD, Howe LD. Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep duration, and childhood overweight: a longitudinal cohort study. J Pediatr. 2015;166(3):632-9.
Bonuck, K., Chervin, R. D., & Howe, L. D. (2015). Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep duration, and childhood overweight: a longitudinal cohort study. The Journal of Pediatrics, 166(3), 632-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.11.001
Bonuck K, Chervin RD, Howe LD. Sleep-disordered Breathing, Sleep Duration, and Childhood Overweight: a Longitudinal Cohort Study. J Pediatr. 2015;166(3):632-9. PubMed PMID: 25499598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep duration, and childhood overweight: a longitudinal cohort study. AU - Bonuck,Karen, AU - Chervin,Ronald D, AU - Howe,Laura D, Y1 - 2014/11/06/ PY - 2014/07/08/received PY - 2014/10/06/revised PY - 2014/11/03/accepted PY - 2014/12/16/entrez PY - 2014/12/17/pubmed PY - 2015/5/8/medline SP - 632 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 166 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine independent associations between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), sleep duration from birth through 6.75 years, and body mass index (BMI) through 15 years of age in a population-based cohort. STUDY DESIGN: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children collected parent questionnaire data on child sleep duration and SDB symptoms from birth through 6.75 years and child BMI from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children research clinics (n = 1899). For SDB, logistic regression models-minimal, confounder, and confounder + sleep duration adjusted-examined associations with BMI at 7, 10, and 15 years of age. For short sleep duration (≤10th percentile), comparable SDB-adjusted models examined associations with BMI at 15 years of age. RESULTS: Children with the worst SDB symptoms vs asymptomatic children, had increased odds of overweight at 7 (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.04-4.17), 10 (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.02-3.16), and 15 years of age (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.27-3.97) in models adjusted for sleep duration. Similarly, short sleep duration at ≈5-6 years was associated with overweight at 15 years, independent of SDB. Children with short sleep duration at 4.75 years were more likely to be overweight at 15 years in minimally (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.52-3.20), confounder (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.34-2.96), and SDB-adjusted (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.36-3.04) models. CONCLUSIONS: Both SDB and short sleep duration significantly and independently increase children's odds of becoming overweight. Findings underscore the potential importance of early identification and remediation of SDB, along with insufficient sleep, as strategies for reducing childhood obesity. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25499598/Sleep_disordered_breathing_sleep_duration_and_childhood_overweight:_a_longitudinal_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(14)01039-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -