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Importance of viruses in acute otitis media.
Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015 Feb; 27(1):110-5.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Acute otitis media occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection. Bacterial otopathogens and respiratory viruses interact and play important roles in acute otitis media development. A better understanding of viral and bacterial interactions may lead to innovative ways to lessen the burden of this common childhood disease.

RECENT FINDINGS

There has been increasing evidence that acute otitis media occurs during upper respiratory infection, even in the absence of nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization. Among the types of viruses associated with acute otitis media, respiratory syncytial virus continues to be the most commonly detected. It is still unclear whether viral load plays an important role in acute otitis media development, but symptomatic upper respiratory tract infection (as opposed to asymptomatic viral infection) is crucial. Widespread use of bacterial and viral vaccines in young children, including pneumococcal conjugate and influenza vaccines, has led to the reduction in otitis media-related healthcare use between 2001 and 2011. There has been no new vaccine against respiratory viruses other than influenza.

SUMMARY

Progress has been made toward the reduction of the burden of acute otitis media in the last decade. Success in reducing acute otitis media incidence will rely mainly on prevention of nasopharyngeal otopathogen colonization, as well as reduction in the incidence of viral upper respiratory tract infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland bDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, Holon, Israel cDivision of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25514574

Citation

Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna, et al. "Importance of Viruses in Acute Otitis Media." Current Opinion in Pediatrics, vol. 27, no. 1, 2015, pp. 110-5.
Nokso-Koivisto J, Marom T, Chonmaitree T. Importance of viruses in acute otitis media. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015;27(1):110-5.
Nokso-Koivisto, J., Marom, T., & Chonmaitree, T. (2015). Importance of viruses in acute otitis media. Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 27(1), 110-5. https://doi.org/10.1097/MOP.0000000000000184
Nokso-Koivisto J, Marom T, Chonmaitree T. Importance of Viruses in Acute Otitis Media. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015;27(1):110-5. PubMed PMID: 25514574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Importance of viruses in acute otitis media. AU - Nokso-Koivisto,Johanna, AU - Marom,Tal, AU - Chonmaitree,Tasnee, PY - 2014/12/17/entrez PY - 2014/12/17/pubmed PY - 2015/9/25/medline SP - 110 EP - 5 JF - Current opinion in pediatrics JO - Curr Opin Pediatr VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Acute otitis media occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection. Bacterial otopathogens and respiratory viruses interact and play important roles in acute otitis media development. A better understanding of viral and bacterial interactions may lead to innovative ways to lessen the burden of this common childhood disease. RECENT FINDINGS: There has been increasing evidence that acute otitis media occurs during upper respiratory infection, even in the absence of nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization. Among the types of viruses associated with acute otitis media, respiratory syncytial virus continues to be the most commonly detected. It is still unclear whether viral load plays an important role in acute otitis media development, but symptomatic upper respiratory tract infection (as opposed to asymptomatic viral infection) is crucial. Widespread use of bacterial and viral vaccines in young children, including pneumococcal conjugate and influenza vaccines, has led to the reduction in otitis media-related healthcare use between 2001 and 2011. There has been no new vaccine against respiratory viruses other than influenza. SUMMARY: Progress has been made toward the reduction of the burden of acute otitis media in the last decade. Success in reducing acute otitis media incidence will rely mainly on prevention of nasopharyngeal otopathogen colonization, as well as reduction in the incidence of viral upper respiratory tract infection. SN - 1531-698X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25514574/Importance_of_viruses_in_acute_otitis_media_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MOP.0000000000000184 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -