Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts.
Arch Suicide Res 2015; 19(3):350-65AS

Abstract

The present study examined the relation between cognitive response styles (i.e., brooding, reflection, distraction) and cognitive inflexibility in differentially predicting history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) only, suicide attempt (SA) only, or both (NSSI + SA). College students (N = 352) completed self-report measures of rumination, distraction, and self-harm history, a diagnostic interview, and a computerized task measuring cognitive flexibility. Brooding uniquely predicted SA-only history, while reflection uniquely predicted history of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Distraction was associated with lower odds of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Cognitive inflexibility was not significantly associated with self-harm history. Cognitive vulnerabilities may help identify individuals who are at risk for self-harm and may differentiate between NSSI and SA.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25517765

Citation

Polanco-Roman, Lillian, et al. "Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Versus Suicide Attempts." Archives of Suicide Research : Official Journal of the International Academy for Suicide Research, vol. 19, no. 3, 2015, pp. 350-65.
Polanco-Roman L, Jurska J, Quiñones V, et al. Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts. Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(3):350-65.
Polanco-Roman, L., Jurska, J., Quiñones, V., & Miranda, R. (2015). Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts. Archives of Suicide Research : Official Journal of the International Academy for Suicide Research, 19(3), pp. 350-65. doi:10.1080/13811118.2014.981623.
Polanco-Roman L, et al. Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Versus Suicide Attempts. Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(3):350-65. PubMed PMID: 25517765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts. AU - Polanco-Roman,Lillian, AU - Jurska,Justyna, AU - Quiñones,Victoria, AU - Miranda,Regina, Y1 - 2014/12/17/ PY - 2014/12/18/entrez PY - 2014/12/18/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline KW - cognitive inflexibility KW - distraction KW - non-suicidal self-injury KW - rumination KW - suicide attempts SP - 350 EP - 65 JF - Archives of suicide research : official journal of the International Academy for Suicide Research JO - Arch Suicide Res VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - The present study examined the relation between cognitive response styles (i.e., brooding, reflection, distraction) and cognitive inflexibility in differentially predicting history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) only, suicide attempt (SA) only, or both (NSSI + SA). College students (N = 352) completed self-report measures of rumination, distraction, and self-harm history, a diagnostic interview, and a computerized task measuring cognitive flexibility. Brooding uniquely predicted SA-only history, while reflection uniquely predicted history of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Distraction was associated with lower odds of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Cognitive inflexibility was not significantly associated with self-harm history. Cognitive vulnerabilities may help identify individuals who are at risk for self-harm and may differentiate between NSSI and SA. SN - 1543-6136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25517765/Brooding_Reflection_and_Distraction:_Relation_to_Non_Suicidal_Self_Injury_versus_Suicide_Attempts_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13811118.2014.981623 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -