Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts.
Genome Res. 2015 Jan; 25(1):1-13.GR

Abstract

Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (≤ 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein-protein interactions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, United Kingdom; Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, United Kingdom yangili@stanford.edu chris.ponting@dpag.ox.ac.uk.MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, United Kingdom;MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, United Kingdom;MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, United Kingdom; yangili@stanford.edu chris.ponting@dpag.ox.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25524026

Citation

Li, Yang I., et al. "RBFOX and PTBP1 Proteins Regulate the Alternative Splicing of Micro-exons in Human Brain Transcripts." Genome Research, vol. 25, no. 1, 2015, pp. 1-13.
Li YI, Sanchez-Pulido L, Haerty W, et al. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts. Genome Res. 2015;25(1):1-13.
Li, Y. I., Sanchez-Pulido, L., Haerty, W., & Ponting, C. P. (2015). RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts. Genome Research, 25(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1101/gr.181990.114
Li YI, et al. RBFOX and PTBP1 Proteins Regulate the Alternative Splicing of Micro-exons in Human Brain Transcripts. Genome Res. 2015;25(1):1-13. PubMed PMID: 25524026.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts. AU - Li,Yang I, AU - Sanchez-Pulido,Luis, AU - Haerty,Wilfried, AU - Ponting,Chris P, PY - 2014/12/20/entrez PY - 2014/12/20/pubmed PY - 2015/9/29/medline SP - 1 EP - 13 JF - Genome research JO - Genome Res. VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (≤ 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein-protein interactions. SN - 1549-5469 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25524026/RBFOX_and_PTBP1_proteins_regulate_the_alternative_splicing_of_micro_exons_in_human_brain_transcripts_ L2 - http://genome.cshlp.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25524026 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -