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Body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly men but elderly women had a higher prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in a population of Korean adults.
Nutr Res. 2015 Jan; 35(1):1-6.NR

Abstract

In this study, we examined the relationship between sarcopenic obesity (SO) and nutrition status, according to sex in Korean adults who were 60 years or older. Body composition was categorized as SO, sarcopenic nonobesity, nonsarcopenic obesity, and nonsarcopenic nonobesity. Obesity was defined by body mass index. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by weight (Wt) of less than 1 SD below the sex-specific mean for young adults. Subjects included 1433 subjects (658 men and 775 women) who were 60 years or older and who participated in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2010. Sarcopenic obesity was more prevalent in women (31.3%) than in men (19.6%). Individuals with SO had significantly higher fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (male: 3.2 ± 1.4, female: 3.4 ± 2.1), and triglycerides (male: 167.3 ± 90.6 mg/dL, female: 160.7 ± 85.0 mg/dL). High-density lipoprotein was under the normal criteria (50 mg/dL) in women. Intake of nutrients associated with muscle loss (protein, vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C) was significantly different among the male but not the female groups. Although protein intake was normal, calcium and vitamin D intakes were insufficient in all groups. In conclusion, body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly (60 years or older) men but not elderly women. Women had a higher prevalence of SO than did men, suggesting that early nutritional intervention in elderly women may help them address age-associated body composition changes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Health Care, Kyungsung University, Busan, 309, Suyeong-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-736, South Korea. Electronic address: ocr531@ks.ac.kr.Center for Rehabilitation & Clinical Aging Research Institute, Pusan Medical Center, 359, Worldcup-daero, Yonje-gu, Busan 611-706, Korea. Electronic address: jhokug@hanmail.net.Department of Nutrition and Health Care, Kyungsung University, Busan, 309, Suyeong-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-736, South Korea. Electronic address: jkno3@ks.ac.kr.Department of Foodservice Management, Kyungsung University, Busan, 309, Suyeong-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-736, South Korea. Electronic address: foodservice@ks.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25524331

Citation

Oh, Chorong, et al. "Body Composition Changes Were Related to Nutrient Intakes in Elderly Men but Elderly Women Had a Higher Prevalence of Sarcopenic Obesity in a Population of Korean Adults." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 35, no. 1, 2015, pp. 1-6.
Oh C, Jho S, No JK, et al. Body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly men but elderly women had a higher prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in a population of Korean adults. Nutr Res. 2015;35(1):1-6.
Oh, C., Jho, S., No, J. K., & Kim, H. S. (2015). Body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly men but elderly women had a higher prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in a population of Korean adults. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 35(1), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2014.07.018
Oh C, et al. Body Composition Changes Were Related to Nutrient Intakes in Elderly Men but Elderly Women Had a Higher Prevalence of Sarcopenic Obesity in a Population of Korean Adults. Nutr Res. 2015;35(1):1-6. PubMed PMID: 25524331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly men but elderly women had a higher prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in a population of Korean adults. AU - Oh,Chorong, AU - Jho,Sunkug, AU - No,Jae-Kyung, AU - Kim,Hak-Seon, Y1 - 2014/08/19/ PY - 2014/01/02/received PY - 2014/07/03/revised PY - 2014/07/16/accepted PY - 2014/12/20/entrez PY - 2014/12/20/pubmed PY - 2015/9/24/medline KW - Body composition KW - Elderly KW - Human KW - Nutrient status KW - Obesity SP - 1 EP - 6 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - In this study, we examined the relationship between sarcopenic obesity (SO) and nutrition status, according to sex in Korean adults who were 60 years or older. Body composition was categorized as SO, sarcopenic nonobesity, nonsarcopenic obesity, and nonsarcopenic nonobesity. Obesity was defined by body mass index. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by weight (Wt) of less than 1 SD below the sex-specific mean for young adults. Subjects included 1433 subjects (658 men and 775 women) who were 60 years or older and who participated in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2010. Sarcopenic obesity was more prevalent in women (31.3%) than in men (19.6%). Individuals with SO had significantly higher fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (male: 3.2 ± 1.4, female: 3.4 ± 2.1), and triglycerides (male: 167.3 ± 90.6 mg/dL, female: 160.7 ± 85.0 mg/dL). High-density lipoprotein was under the normal criteria (50 mg/dL) in women. Intake of nutrients associated with muscle loss (protein, vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C) was significantly different among the male but not the female groups. Although protein intake was normal, calcium and vitamin D intakes were insufficient in all groups. In conclusion, body composition changes were related to nutrient intakes in elderly (60 years or older) men but not elderly women. Women had a higher prevalence of SO than did men, suggesting that early nutritional intervention in elderly women may help them address age-associated body composition changes. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25524331/Body_composition_changes_were_related_to_nutrient_intakes_in_elderly_men_but_elderly_women_had_a_higher_prevalence_of_sarcopenic_obesity_in_a_population_of_Korean_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(14)00141-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -