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Fiber intake and risk of subsequent prostate cancer in Japanese men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jan; 101(1):118-25.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dietary fiber may reduce the risk of prostate cancer, possibly by increasing circulating concentrations of sex hormone-binding globulin and improving insulin sensitivity. However, results from previous epidemiologic studies of fiber intake and prostate cancer are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, no study has comprehensively evaluated the effects of soluble and insoluble fiber on prostate cancer in Asia.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to examine the association between fiber intake and prostate cancer in Japanese men.

DESIGN

We conducted a population-based prospective study in 43,435 Japanese men aged 45-74 y. Participants responded to a validated questionnaire, which included 138 food items. Follow-up was from 1995 through 2009. HRs and 95% CIs of incidence were calculated according to quartiles of fiber intake.

RESULTS

During the 11.6-y follow-up, of the 825 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, 213 had advanced-stage cancer, 582 had organ-localized disease, and 30 had an undetermined stage of disease. Among them, 217 cases were detected by subjective symptoms. Total fiber was not associated with total or advanced prostate cancer, with respective multivariable HRs for the highest and lowest quartiles of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.29; P-trend = 0.97) and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.07; P-trend = 0.30). Total fiber and insoluble fiber intake were associated with a decreased risk of advanced cancers detected by subjective symptoms, with multivariate HRs (95% CIs) across increasing quartiles of 1.00, 0.58, 0.62, and 0.44 (0.21, 0.92; P-trend = 0.05) for total fiber and 1.00, 0.60, 0.52, and 0.46 (0.22, 0.93; P-trend = 0.04) for insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber intake showed no association with prostate cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

Dietary fiber is inversely associated with advanced prostate cancer detected by subjective symptoms even among populations with relatively low intake, such as Japanese. These results suggest that a very low intake of dietary fiber is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).From the Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (NS, M Iwasaki, TY, TS, SS, M Inoue, and ST), and AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (M Inoue).No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25527755

Citation

Sawada, Norie, et al. "Fiber Intake and Risk of Subsequent Prostate Cancer in Japanese Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 1, 2015, pp. 118-25.
Sawada N, Iwasaki M, Yamaji T, et al. Fiber intake and risk of subsequent prostate cancer in Japanese men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(1):118-25.
Sawada, N., Iwasaki, M., Yamaji, T., Shimazu, T., Sasazuki, S., Inoue, M., & Tsugane, S. (2015). Fiber intake and risk of subsequent prostate cancer in Japanese men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(1), 118-25. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.089581
Sawada N, et al. Fiber Intake and Risk of Subsequent Prostate Cancer in Japanese Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(1):118-25. PubMed PMID: 25527755.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fiber intake and risk of subsequent prostate cancer in Japanese men. AU - Sawada,Norie, AU - Iwasaki,Motoki, AU - Yamaji,Taiki, AU - Shimazu,Taichi, AU - Sasazuki,Shizuka, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, AU - ,, Y1 - 2014/11/19/ PY - 2014/12/21/entrez PY - 2014/12/21/pubmed PY - 2015/2/19/medline KW - JPHC Study KW - Japanese men KW - fiber intake KW - prospective study KW - prostate cancer SP - 118 EP - 25 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 101 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dietary fiber may reduce the risk of prostate cancer, possibly by increasing circulating concentrations of sex hormone-binding globulin and improving insulin sensitivity. However, results from previous epidemiologic studies of fiber intake and prostate cancer are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, no study has comprehensively evaluated the effects of soluble and insoluble fiber on prostate cancer in Asia. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the association between fiber intake and prostate cancer in Japanese men. DESIGN: We conducted a population-based prospective study in 43,435 Japanese men aged 45-74 y. Participants responded to a validated questionnaire, which included 138 food items. Follow-up was from 1995 through 2009. HRs and 95% CIs of incidence were calculated according to quartiles of fiber intake. RESULTS: During the 11.6-y follow-up, of the 825 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, 213 had advanced-stage cancer, 582 had organ-localized disease, and 30 had an undetermined stage of disease. Among them, 217 cases were detected by subjective symptoms. Total fiber was not associated with total or advanced prostate cancer, with respective multivariable HRs for the highest and lowest quartiles of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.29; P-trend = 0.97) and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.07; P-trend = 0.30). Total fiber and insoluble fiber intake were associated with a decreased risk of advanced cancers detected by subjective symptoms, with multivariate HRs (95% CIs) across increasing quartiles of 1.00, 0.58, 0.62, and 0.44 (0.21, 0.92; P-trend = 0.05) for total fiber and 1.00, 0.60, 0.52, and 0.46 (0.22, 0.93; P-trend = 0.04) for insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber intake showed no association with prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary fiber is inversely associated with advanced prostate cancer detected by subjective symptoms even among populations with relatively low intake, such as Japanese. These results suggest that a very low intake of dietary fiber is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25527755/Fiber_intake_and_risk_of_subsequent_prostate_cancer_in_Japanese_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.089581 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -