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Zinc induces distinct changes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in the roots of two Brassica species with different sensitivity to zinc stress.
Ann Bot. 2015 Sep; 116(4):613-25.AB

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient naturally present in soils, but anthropogenic activities can lead to accumulation in the environment and resulting damage to plants. Heavy metals such as Zn can induce oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), which can reduce growth and yield in crop plants. This study assesses the interplay of these two families of molecules in order to evaluate the responses in roots of two Brassica species under high concentrations of Zn.

METHODS

Nine-day-old hydroponically grown Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and B. napus (oilseed rape) seedlings were treated with ZnSO4 (0, 50, 150 and 300 µm) for 7 d. Stress intensity was assessed through analyses of cell wall damage and cell viability. Biochemical and cellular techniques were used to measure key components of the metabolism of ROS and RNS including lipid peroxidation, enzymatic antioxidants, protein nitration and content of superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)).

KEY RESULTS

Analysis of morphological root damage and alterations of microelement homeostasis indicate that B. juncea is more tolerant to Zn stress than B. napus. ROS and RNS parameters suggest that the oxidative components are predominant compared with the nitrosative components in the root system of both species.

CONCLUSIONS

The results indicate a clear relationship between ROS and RNS metabolism as a mechanism of response against stress caused by an excess of Zn. The oxidative stress components seem to be more dominant than the elements of the nitrosative stress in the root system of these two Brassica species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and fglgbr@gmail.com.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and.Group of Antioxidants, Free Radicals and Nitric Oxide in Biotechnology, Food and Agriculture, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Granada, Spain.Group of Antioxidants, Free Radicals and Nitric Oxide in Biotechnology, Food and Agriculture, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Granada, Spain.Group of Antioxidants, Free Radicals and Nitric Oxide in Biotechnology, Food and Agriculture, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Granada, Spain.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25538112

Citation

Feigl, Gábor, et al. "Zinc Induces Distinct Changes in the Metabolism of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS and RNS) in the Roots of Two Brassica Species With Different Sensitivity to Zinc Stress." Annals of Botany, vol. 116, no. 4, 2015, pp. 613-25.
Feigl G, Lehotai N, Molnár Á, et al. Zinc induces distinct changes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in the roots of two Brassica species with different sensitivity to zinc stress. Ann Bot. 2015;116(4):613-25.
Feigl, G., Lehotai, N., Molnár, Á., Ördög, A., Rodríguez-Ruiz, M., Palma, J. M., Corpas, F. J., Erdei, L., & Kolbert, Z. (2015). Zinc induces distinct changes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in the roots of two Brassica species with different sensitivity to zinc stress. Annals of Botany, 116(4), 613-25. https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcu246
Feigl G, et al. Zinc Induces Distinct Changes in the Metabolism of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS and RNS) in the Roots of Two Brassica Species With Different Sensitivity to Zinc Stress. Ann Bot. 2015;116(4):613-25. PubMed PMID: 25538112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zinc induces distinct changes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in the roots of two Brassica species with different sensitivity to zinc stress. AU - Feigl,Gábor, AU - Lehotai,Nóra, AU - Molnár,Árpád, AU - Ördög,Attila, AU - Rodríguez-Ruiz,Marta, AU - Palma,José M, AU - Corpas,Francisco J, AU - Erdei,László, AU - Kolbert,Zsuzsanna, Y1 - 2014/12/22/ PY - 2014/08/04/received PY - 2014/10/29/accepted PY - 2014/12/25/entrez PY - 2014/12/30/pubmed PY - 2016/6/18/medline KW - Brassica juncea KW - Brassica napus KW - Indian mustard KW - RNS KW - ROS KW - excess zinc KW - nitrosative stress KW - oilseed rape KW - oxidative stress KW - protein nitration KW - reactive nitrogen species KW - reactive oxygen species SP - 613 EP - 25 JF - Annals of botany JO - Ann Bot VL - 116 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient naturally present in soils, but anthropogenic activities can lead to accumulation in the environment and resulting damage to plants. Heavy metals such as Zn can induce oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), which can reduce growth and yield in crop plants. This study assesses the interplay of these two families of molecules in order to evaluate the responses in roots of two Brassica species under high concentrations of Zn. METHODS: Nine-day-old hydroponically grown Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and B. napus (oilseed rape) seedlings were treated with ZnSO4 (0, 50, 150 and 300 µm) for 7 d. Stress intensity was assessed through analyses of cell wall damage and cell viability. Biochemical and cellular techniques were used to measure key components of the metabolism of ROS and RNS including lipid peroxidation, enzymatic antioxidants, protein nitration and content of superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). KEY RESULTS: Analysis of morphological root damage and alterations of microelement homeostasis indicate that B. juncea is more tolerant to Zn stress than B. napus. ROS and RNS parameters suggest that the oxidative components are predominant compared with the nitrosative components in the root system of both species. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate a clear relationship between ROS and RNS metabolism as a mechanism of response against stress caused by an excess of Zn. The oxidative stress components seem to be more dominant than the elements of the nitrosative stress in the root system of these two Brassica species. SN - 1095-8290 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25538112/Zinc_induces_distinct_changes_in_the_metabolism_of_reactive_oxygen_and_nitrogen_species__ROS_and_RNS__in_the_roots_of_two_Brassica_species_with_different_sensitivity_to_zinc_stress_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -