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Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy.
J Interpers Violence. 2016 Mar; 31(6):1095-115.JI

Abstract

The current study has three aims: (1) to describe the frequency, gender differences, and agreement in couples' reports of male-to-female and female-to-male intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by male veterans and their female partners who were seeking couples therapy; (2) to describe the pattern of violence reported by these couples (e.g., one-sided, mutual) and determine if frequency of violence varied based on patterns; and (3) to examine whether frequency of violence or pattern of violence were associated with veteran diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One hundred heterosexual couples (male Iraq/Afghanistan veteran, female civilian) seeking couples therapy at a Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic completed self-report measures of violence in their relationship. Almost all couples reported verbal aggression. Men reported perpetrating more frequent sexual coercion, and women reported perpetrating more frequent physical aggression. Correspondence in partners' reports of violence varied based on type of violence from high correspondence on verbal aggression to low correspondence on sexual coercion. Three patterns of violence were identified: verbally aggressive (n = 45), one-sided physically aggressive (n = 27), and mutually physically aggressive (n = 26). Mutually physically aggressive couples generally reported the most frequent violence. Frequency and pattern of violence were not associated with veteran diagnosis of PTSD. Findings underscore the need for clinicians to assess both partners for violence perpetration and the need for effective prevention strategies and treatments for IPV among veterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA teten@bcm.edu.Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, OK, USA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, USA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, OK, USA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, USA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, OK, USA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, USA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25538118

Citation

Tharp, Andra Teten, et al. "Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 31, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1095-115.
Tharp AT, Sherman MD, Bowling U, et al. Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy. J Interpers Violence. 2016;31(6):1095-115.
Tharp, A. T., Sherman, M. D., Bowling, U., & Townsend, B. J. (2016). Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 31(6), 1095-115. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260514564067
Tharp AT, et al. Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy. J Interpers Violence. 2016;31(6):1095-115. PubMed PMID: 25538118.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy. AU - Tharp,Andra Teten, AU - Sherman,Michelle D, AU - Bowling,Ursula, AU - Townsend,Bradford J, Y1 - 2014/12/22/ PY - 2014/12/25/entrez PY - 2014/12/30/pubmed PY - 2016/10/22/medline KW - Global War on Terror KW - couples therapy KW - intimate partner violence KW - veterans SP - 1095 EP - 115 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - The current study has three aims: (1) to describe the frequency, gender differences, and agreement in couples' reports of male-to-female and female-to-male intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by male veterans and their female partners who were seeking couples therapy; (2) to describe the pattern of violence reported by these couples (e.g., one-sided, mutual) and determine if frequency of violence varied based on patterns; and (3) to examine whether frequency of violence or pattern of violence were associated with veteran diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One hundred heterosexual couples (male Iraq/Afghanistan veteran, female civilian) seeking couples therapy at a Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic completed self-report measures of violence in their relationship. Almost all couples reported verbal aggression. Men reported perpetrating more frequent sexual coercion, and women reported perpetrating more frequent physical aggression. Correspondence in partners' reports of violence varied based on type of violence from high correspondence on verbal aggression to low correspondence on sexual coercion. Three patterns of violence were identified: verbally aggressive (n = 45), one-sided physically aggressive (n = 27), and mutually physically aggressive (n = 26). Mutually physically aggressive couples generally reported the most frequent violence. Frequency and pattern of violence were not associated with veteran diagnosis of PTSD. Findings underscore the need for clinicians to assess both partners for violence perpetration and the need for effective prevention strategies and treatments for IPV among veterans. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25538118/Intimate_Partner_Violence_Between_Male_Iraq_and_Afghanistan_Veterans_and_Their_Female_Partners_Who_Seek_Couples_Therapy_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -