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A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014 Dec 24; 11:144.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The home food environment is an important setting for the development of dietary patterns in childhood. Interventions that support parents to modify the home food environment for their children, however, may also improve parent diet. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschool children on the fruit and vegetable consumption of parents.

METHODS

In 2010, 394 parents of 3-5 year-old children from 30 preschools in the Hunter region of Australia were recruited to this cluster randomised controlled trial and were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Intervention group parents received four weekly 30-minute telephone calls and written resources. The scripted calls focused on; fruit and vegetable availability and accessibility, parental role-modelling, and supportive home food routines. Two items from the Australian National Nutrition Survey were used to assess the average number of serves of fruit and vegetables consumed each day by parents at baseline, and 2-, 6-, 12-, and 18-months later, using generalised estimating equations (adjusted for baseline values and clustering by preschool) and an intention-to-treat-approach.

RESULTS

At each follow-up, vegetable consumption among intervention parents significantly exceeded that of controls. At 2-months the difference was 0.71 serves (95% CI: 0.58-0.85, p < 0.0001), and at 18-months the difference was 0.36 serves (95% CI: 0.10-0.61, p = 0.0067). Fruit consumption among intervention parents was found to significantly exceed consumption of control parents at the 2-,12- and 18-month follow-up, with the difference at 2-months being 0.26 serves (95% CI: 0.12-0.40, p = 0.0003), and 0.26 serves maintained at 18-months, (95% CI: 0.10-0.43, p = 0.0015).

CONCLUSIONS

A four-contact telephone-based intervention that focuses on changing characteristics of preschoolers' home food environment can increase parents' fruit and vegetable consumption. (ANZCTR12609000820202).

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. rebecca.wyse@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), Newcastle, NSW, Australia. rebecca.wyse@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.Centre for Physical Activity & Nutrition Research, School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. karen.campbell@deakin.edu.au.School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. leah.brennan@med.monash.edu.au.School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. luke.wolfenden@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), Newcastle, NSW, Australia. luke.wolfenden@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. Hunter New England Population Health, Locked Bag 10, Wallsend, 2287, NSW, Australia. luke.wolfenden@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25540041

Citation

Wyse, Rebecca, et al. "A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of a Telephone-based Intervention Targeting the Home Food Environment of Preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the Effect On Parent Fruit and Vegetable Consumption." The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 11, 2014, p. 144.
Wyse R, Campbell KJ, Brennan L, et al. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:144.
Wyse, R., Campbell, K. J., Brennan, L., & Wolfenden, L. (2014). A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption. The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11, 144. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-014-0144-6
Wyse R, et al. A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of a Telephone-based Intervention Targeting the Home Food Environment of Preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the Effect On Parent Fruit and Vegetable Consumption. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014 Dec 24;11:144. PubMed PMID: 25540041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption. AU - Wyse,Rebecca, AU - Campbell,Karen J, AU - Brennan,Leah, AU - Wolfenden,Luke, Y1 - 2014/12/24/ PY - 2014/04/24/received PY - 2014/11/07/accepted PY - 2014/12/26/entrez PY - 2014/12/30/pubmed PY - 2015/11/5/medline SP - 144 EP - 144 JF - The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity JO - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The home food environment is an important setting for the development of dietary patterns in childhood. Interventions that support parents to modify the home food environment for their children, however, may also improve parent diet. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschool children on the fruit and vegetable consumption of parents. METHODS: In 2010, 394 parents of 3-5 year-old children from 30 preschools in the Hunter region of Australia were recruited to this cluster randomised controlled trial and were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Intervention group parents received four weekly 30-minute telephone calls and written resources. The scripted calls focused on; fruit and vegetable availability and accessibility, parental role-modelling, and supportive home food routines. Two items from the Australian National Nutrition Survey were used to assess the average number of serves of fruit and vegetables consumed each day by parents at baseline, and 2-, 6-, 12-, and 18-months later, using generalised estimating equations (adjusted for baseline values and clustering by preschool) and an intention-to-treat-approach. RESULTS: At each follow-up, vegetable consumption among intervention parents significantly exceeded that of controls. At 2-months the difference was 0.71 serves (95% CI: 0.58-0.85, p < 0.0001), and at 18-months the difference was 0.36 serves (95% CI: 0.10-0.61, p = 0.0067). Fruit consumption among intervention parents was found to significantly exceed consumption of control parents at the 2-,12- and 18-month follow-up, with the difference at 2-months being 0.26 serves (95% CI: 0.12-0.40, p = 0.0003), and 0.26 serves maintained at 18-months, (95% CI: 0.10-0.43, p = 0.0015). CONCLUSIONS: A four-contact telephone-based intervention that focuses on changing characteristics of preschoolers' home food environment can increase parents' fruit and vegetable consumption. (ANZCTR12609000820202). SN - 1479-5868 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25540041/A_cluster_randomised_controlled_trial_of_a_telephone_based_intervention_targeting_the_home_food_environment_of_preschoolers__The_Healthy_Habits_Trial_:_the_effect_on_parent_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_ L2 - https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12966-014-0144-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -