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Prospective cohort study on the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization.
Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2015 Feb; 22(2):229-34.CV

Abstract

Pneumonia and acute exacerbation of chronic illness are leading causes of influenza-related hospitalization. Therefore, influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are strongly recommended for adults with comorbidities. Using a hospital-based influenza surveillance system, we performed a multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients visiting emergency rooms with influenza-like illness (ILI) during the influenza epidemic period in 2013 to 2014. Patients aged ≥ 19 years were enrolled, and clinical data were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization. During study periods, 2,262 patients with ILI were registered. Among 2,217 patients with available vaccination records, 31.9% (707 patients) and 9.7% (216 patients) had received influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, respectively. Among patients who had been administered a pneumococcal vaccine, 94.4% had received the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). The adjusted rates of effectiveness of the influenza vaccine for preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization were 64.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 29% to 81%) and 35.0% (95% CI = 12% to 52%), respectively. Pneumococcal vaccination did not reduce pneumonia development or hospitalization. In conclusion, influenza rather than PPV23 vaccination may reduce pneumonia development and hospitalization in patients with preceding ILI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Transgovernmental Enterprise for Pandemic Influenza in Korea (TEPIK), Seoul, Republic of Korea.Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea.Catholic University Medical College, St. Vincent's Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea.Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea.Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea.Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan, Republic of Korea.Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Transgovernmental Enterprise for Pandemic Influenza in Korea (TEPIK), Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Transgovernmental Enterprise for Pandemic Influenza in Korea (TEPIK), Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Transgovernmental Enterprise for Pandemic Influenza in Korea (TEPIK), Seoul, Republic of Korea wjkim@korea.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25540271

Citation

Song, Joon Young, et al. "Prospective Cohort Study On the Effectiveness of Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines in Preventing Pneumonia Development and Hospitalization." Clinical and Vaccine Immunology : CVI, vol. 22, no. 2, 2015, pp. 229-34.
Song JY, Lee JS, Wie SH, et al. Prospective cohort study on the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization. Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2015;22(2):229-34.
Song, J. Y., Lee, J. S., Wie, S. H., Kim, H. Y., Lee, J., Seo, Y. B., Jeong, H. W., Kim, S. W., Lee, S. H., Park, K. H., Noh, J. Y., Choi, W. S., Cheong, H. J., & Kim, W. J. (2015). Prospective cohort study on the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology : CVI, 22(2), 229-34. https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00673-14
Song JY, et al. Prospective Cohort Study On the Effectiveness of Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines in Preventing Pneumonia Development and Hospitalization. Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2015;22(2):229-34. PubMed PMID: 25540271.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective cohort study on the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization. AU - Song,Joon Young, AU - Lee,Jin Soo, AU - Wie,Seong-Heon, AU - Kim,Hyo Youl, AU - Lee,Jacob, AU - Seo,Yu Bin, AU - Jeong,Hye Won, AU - Kim,Shin Woo, AU - Lee,Sun Hee, AU - Park,Kyung-Hwa, AU - Noh,Ji Yun, AU - Choi,Won Suk, AU - Cheong,Hee Jin, AU - Kim,Woo Joo, Y1 - 2014/12/24/ PY - 2014/12/26/entrez PY - 2014/12/30/pubmed PY - 2015/10/16/medline SP - 229 EP - 34 JF - Clinical and vaccine immunology : CVI JO - Clin Vaccine Immunol VL - 22 IS - 2 N2 - Pneumonia and acute exacerbation of chronic illness are leading causes of influenza-related hospitalization. Therefore, influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are strongly recommended for adults with comorbidities. Using a hospital-based influenza surveillance system, we performed a multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients visiting emergency rooms with influenza-like illness (ILI) during the influenza epidemic period in 2013 to 2014. Patients aged ≥ 19 years were enrolled, and clinical data were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization. During study periods, 2,262 patients with ILI were registered. Among 2,217 patients with available vaccination records, 31.9% (707 patients) and 9.7% (216 patients) had received influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, respectively. Among patients who had been administered a pneumococcal vaccine, 94.4% had received the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). The adjusted rates of effectiveness of the influenza vaccine for preventing pneumonia development and hospitalization were 64.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 29% to 81%) and 35.0% (95% CI = 12% to 52%), respectively. Pneumococcal vaccination did not reduce pneumonia development or hospitalization. In conclusion, influenza rather than PPV23 vaccination may reduce pneumonia development and hospitalization in patients with preceding ILI. SN - 1556-679X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25540271/Prospective_cohort_study_on_the_effectiveness_of_influenza_and_pneumococcal_vaccines_in_preventing_pneumonia_development_and_hospitalization_ L2 - http://cvi.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25540271 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -