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Arthroscopic repair of a significant (>50%) partial-thickness subscapularis tear concomitant with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear: technical considerations for subscapularis repair (transtendon technique versus tear completion).
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2015 Jun; 24(6):875-81.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and structural integrity of arthroscopic repair by either transtendon repair or tear completion for a significant (>50%) partial-thickness articular-side subscapularis tear associated with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear.

METHODS

The study population comprised 109 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for partial-thickness subscapularis tears associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tears with either a transtendon technique (81 patients, group T) or tear completion (28 patients, group C). Pain on a visual analog scale; the Subjective Shoulder Value; the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; and the University of California, Los Angeles shoulder score were used to compare clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. At 6 months after surgery, magnetic resonance arthrography or computed tomographic arthrography was performed to assess structural integrity.

RESULTS

At the 2-year follow-up, there were no significant differences in functional outcomes between groups. In group T, external rotation was reduced significantly from 55° to 51° (P < .001). The subscapularis and overall retear rates were 8% and 19%, respectively, in group T and 12% and 23%, respectively, in group C. There were no significant differences in retear rates between groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness subscapularis tears associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tears using either the transtendon technique or tear completion resulted in significant functional improvements in both groups except for postoperative external rotation in group T, and there were no significant differences between groups. The retear rates were also not significantly different between groups. However, after subscapularis repair using the transtendon technique, some patients may have decreased external rotation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: min1201@hanmail.net.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25547855

Citation

Kim, Sung-Jae, et al. "Arthroscopic Repair of a Significant (>50%) Partial-thickness Subscapularis Tear Concomitant With a Full-thickness Supraspinatus Tear: Technical Considerations for Subscapularis Repair (transtendon Technique Versus Tear Completion)." Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, vol. 24, no. 6, 2015, pp. 875-81.
Kim SJ, Jung M, Lee JH, et al. Arthroscopic repair of a significant (>50%) partial-thickness subscapularis tear concomitant with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear: technical considerations for subscapularis repair (transtendon technique versus tear completion). J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2015;24(6):875-81.
Kim, S. J., Jung, M., Lee, J. H., Park, J. H., & Chun, Y. M. (2015). Arthroscopic repair of a significant (>50%) partial-thickness subscapularis tear concomitant with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear: technical considerations for subscapularis repair (transtendon technique versus tear completion). Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 24(6), 875-81. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2014.10.009
Kim SJ, et al. Arthroscopic Repair of a Significant (>50%) Partial-thickness Subscapularis Tear Concomitant With a Full-thickness Supraspinatus Tear: Technical Considerations for Subscapularis Repair (transtendon Technique Versus Tear Completion). J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2015;24(6):875-81. PubMed PMID: 25547855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arthroscopic repair of a significant (>50%) partial-thickness subscapularis tear concomitant with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear: technical considerations for subscapularis repair (transtendon technique versus tear completion). AU - Kim,Sung-Jae, AU - Jung,Min, AU - Lee,Jae-Hoo, AU - Park,Jae-Han, AU - Chun,Yong-Min, Y1 - 2014/12/26/ PY - 2014/06/30/received PY - 2014/10/09/revised PY - 2014/10/19/accepted PY - 2014/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/12/31/pubmed PY - 2015/12/29/medline KW - Shoulder KW - arthroscopy KW - repair KW - rotator cuff tear KW - subscapularis SP - 875 EP - 81 JF - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery JO - J Shoulder Elbow Surg VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and structural integrity of arthroscopic repair by either transtendon repair or tear completion for a significant (>50%) partial-thickness articular-side subscapularis tear associated with a full-thickness supraspinatus tear. METHODS: The study population comprised 109 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for partial-thickness subscapularis tears associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tears with either a transtendon technique (81 patients, group T) or tear completion (28 patients, group C). Pain on a visual analog scale; the Subjective Shoulder Value; the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; and the University of California, Los Angeles shoulder score were used to compare clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. At 6 months after surgery, magnetic resonance arthrography or computed tomographic arthrography was performed to assess structural integrity. RESULTS: At the 2-year follow-up, there were no significant differences in functional outcomes between groups. In group T, external rotation was reduced significantly from 55° to 51° (P < .001). The subscapularis and overall retear rates were 8% and 19%, respectively, in group T and 12% and 23%, respectively, in group C. There were no significant differences in retear rates between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness subscapularis tears associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tears using either the transtendon technique or tear completion resulted in significant functional improvements in both groups except for postoperative external rotation in group T, and there were no significant differences between groups. The retear rates were also not significantly different between groups. However, after subscapularis repair using the transtendon technique, some patients may have decreased external rotation. SN - 1532-6500 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25547855/Arthroscopic_repair_of_a_significant__>50__partial_thickness_subscapularis_tear_concomitant_with_a_full_thickness_supraspinatus_tear:_technical_considerations_for_subscapularis_repair__transtendon_technique_versus_tear_completion__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1058-2746(14)00575-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -