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The protective role of school friendship ties for substance use and aggressive behaviors among middle school students.
J Sch Health. 2015 Feb; 85(2):82-9.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have examined the interplay among quantifiable aspects of peer bonds, friendship types, personal characteristics, and behavioral outcomes in schools in distressed neighborhoods. The aim of this study was to identify compensatory and protective factors that can be promoted in school-based prevention programs.

METHODS

The sample was comprised of students in East Los Angeles County (N=184). We investigated the association between 3 measures of social influence (friends in gangs, nominations of schoolmates as friends [out-degree], and the number of nominations received from schoolmates [in-degree]) and social self-control with lifetime alcohol, tobacco, inhalant, "other" drug use, and aggression.

RESULTS

Friendships were protective for substance use and aggression and moderated the relationship between social self-control, substance use, and aggression. We found important sex differences; girls who nominated more friends were less likely to report alcohol use and aggression relative to boys but were more likely to have reported drug use as social self-control scores increased.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results have important implications for school-based prevention and intervention programs. We provide preliminary evidence that school ties and perceptions of belongingness can mitigate the effects of several risk factors linked to substance use and aggression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, 2001 N., Soto St., 3rd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90033.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25564976

Citation

Forster, Myriam, et al. "The Protective Role of School Friendship Ties for Substance Use and Aggressive Behaviors Among Middle School Students." The Journal of School Health, vol. 85, no. 2, 2015, pp. 82-9.
Forster M, Grigsby TJ, Bunyan A, et al. The protective role of school friendship ties for substance use and aggressive behaviors among middle school students. J Sch Health. 2015;85(2):82-9.
Forster, M., Grigsby, T. J., Bunyan, A., Unger, J. B., & Valente, T. W. (2015). The protective role of school friendship ties for substance use and aggressive behaviors among middle school students. The Journal of School Health, 85(2), 82-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12230
Forster M, et al. The Protective Role of School Friendship Ties for Substance Use and Aggressive Behaviors Among Middle School Students. J Sch Health. 2015;85(2):82-9. PubMed PMID: 25564976.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The protective role of school friendship ties for substance use and aggressive behaviors among middle school students. AU - Forster,Myriam, AU - Grigsby,Timothy J, AU - Bunyan,Alden, AU - Unger,Jennifer Beth, AU - Valente,Thomas William, PY - 2013/09/25/received PY - 2014/06/01/revised PY - 2014/06/25/accepted PY - 2015/1/8/entrez PY - 2015/1/8/pubmed PY - 2015/9/1/medline KW - adolescence KW - aggression KW - peer associations KW - social self-control KW - substance use SP - 82 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 85 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the interplay among quantifiable aspects of peer bonds, friendship types, personal characteristics, and behavioral outcomes in schools in distressed neighborhoods. The aim of this study was to identify compensatory and protective factors that can be promoted in school-based prevention programs. METHODS: The sample was comprised of students in East Los Angeles County (N=184). We investigated the association between 3 measures of social influence (friends in gangs, nominations of schoolmates as friends [out-degree], and the number of nominations received from schoolmates [in-degree]) and social self-control with lifetime alcohol, tobacco, inhalant, "other" drug use, and aggression. RESULTS: Friendships were protective for substance use and aggression and moderated the relationship between social self-control, substance use, and aggression. We found important sex differences; girls who nominated more friends were less likely to report alcohol use and aggression relative to boys but were more likely to have reported drug use as social self-control scores increased. CONCLUSIONS: Our results have important implications for school-based prevention and intervention programs. We provide preliminary evidence that school ties and perceptions of belongingness can mitigate the effects of several risk factors linked to substance use and aggression. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25564976/The_protective_role_of_school_friendship_ties_for_substance_use_and_aggressive_behaviors_among_middle_school_students_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12230 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -