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Resilience in community: a social ecological development model for young adult sexual minority women.
Am J Community Psychol. 2015 Mar; 55(1-2):179-90.AJ

Abstract

Family support and rejection are associated with health outcomes among sexual minority women (SMW). We examined a social ecological development model among young adult SMW, testing whether identity risk factors or outness to family interacted with family rejection to predict community connectedness and collective self-esteem. Lesbian and bisexual women (N = 843; 57% bisexual) between the ages of 18-25 (M = 21.4; SD = 2.1) completed baseline and 12-month online surveys. The sample identified as White (54.2%), multiple racial backgrounds (16.6%), African American (9.6%) and Asian/Asian American (3.1%); 10.2% endorsed a Hispanic/Latina ethnicity. Rejection ranged from 18 to 41% across family relationships. Longitudinal regression indicated that when outness to family increased, SMW in highly rejecting families demonstrated resilience by finding connections and esteem in sexual minority communities to a greater extent than did non-rejected peers. But, when stigma concerns, concealment motivation, and other identity risk factors increased over the year, high family rejection did not impact community connectedness and SMW reported lower collective self-esteem. Racial minority SMW reported lower community connectedness, but not lower collective self-esteem. Families likely buffer or exacerbate societal risks for ill health. Findings highlight the protective role of LGBTQ communities and normative resilience among SMW and their families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division, Veteran Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA, lindsey.zimmerman@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25572956

Citation

Zimmerman, Lindsey, et al. "Resilience in Community: a Social Ecological Development Model for Young Adult Sexual Minority Women." American Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 55, no. 1-2, 2015, pp. 179-90.
Zimmerman L, Darnell DA, Rhew IC, et al. Resilience in community: a social ecological development model for young adult sexual minority women. Am J Community Psychol. 2015;55(1-2):179-90.
Zimmerman, L., Darnell, D. A., Rhew, I. C., Lee, C. M., & Kaysen, D. (2015). Resilience in community: a social ecological development model for young adult sexual minority women. American Journal of Community Psychology, 55(1-2), 179-90. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-015-9702-6
Zimmerman L, et al. Resilience in Community: a Social Ecological Development Model for Young Adult Sexual Minority Women. Am J Community Psychol. 2015;55(1-2):179-90. PubMed PMID: 25572956.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resilience in community: a social ecological development model for young adult sexual minority women. AU - Zimmerman,Lindsey, AU - Darnell,Doyanne A, AU - Rhew,Isaac C, AU - Lee,Christine M, AU - Kaysen,Debra, PY - 2015/1/10/entrez PY - 2015/1/13/pubmed PY - 2015/11/13/medline SP - 179 EP - 90 JF - American journal of community psychology JO - Am J Community Psychol VL - 55 IS - 1-2 N2 - Family support and rejection are associated with health outcomes among sexual minority women (SMW). We examined a social ecological development model among young adult SMW, testing whether identity risk factors or outness to family interacted with family rejection to predict community connectedness and collective self-esteem. Lesbian and bisexual women (N = 843; 57% bisexual) between the ages of 18-25 (M = 21.4; SD = 2.1) completed baseline and 12-month online surveys. The sample identified as White (54.2%), multiple racial backgrounds (16.6%), African American (9.6%) and Asian/Asian American (3.1%); 10.2% endorsed a Hispanic/Latina ethnicity. Rejection ranged from 18 to 41% across family relationships. Longitudinal regression indicated that when outness to family increased, SMW in highly rejecting families demonstrated resilience by finding connections and esteem in sexual minority communities to a greater extent than did non-rejected peers. But, when stigma concerns, concealment motivation, and other identity risk factors increased over the year, high family rejection did not impact community connectedness and SMW reported lower collective self-esteem. Racial minority SMW reported lower community connectedness, but not lower collective self-esteem. Families likely buffer or exacerbate societal risks for ill health. Findings highlight the protective role of LGBTQ communities and normative resilience among SMW and their families. SN - 1573-2770 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25572956/Resilience_in_community:_a_social_ecological_development_model_for_young_adult_sexual_minority_women_ L2 - https://www.springerlink.com/10.1007/s10464-015-9702-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -