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Medical expenditures associated with nonfatal occupational injuries among U.S. workers reporting persistent disabilities.
Disabil Health J. 2015 Jul; 8(3):397-406.DH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

No prior study has investigated the medical expenditures associated with occupational injuries among U.S. workers with persistent disabilities, including those with physical disabilities or cognitive limitations.

OBJECTIVE

Using the 2004-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data (Panels 9-15), we estimated the 2-year incidence and the expenditures associated with occupational injuries in U.S. workers with and without persistent disabilities.

METHODS

Expenditures were compared by type of service and sources of payment. We estimated the mean medical expenditures using linear regression analysis to adjust for sociodemographics. The statistical analysis accounted for the sample survey design of MEPS and the highly skewed expenditure data.

RESULTS

The 2-year cumulative incidence of occupational injuries was 13.6% (95% CI: 11.6%-15.6%) in workers with persistent disabilities and 7.1% (95% CI: 6.8%-7.4%) in workers without persistent disabilities. The average medical expenditure associated with new occupational injuries in the 2-year follow-up period was $3778 in workers with disabilities, $2212 in workers without disabilities after adjusting for sociodemographics and medical insurance coverage status (in 2011 U.S. dollars, p-value = 0.0004). Of the total expenditures for occupational injuries, workers' compensation paid 54.6% in workers with disabilities and 58.9% in workers without disabilities. There was no significant difference in the proportion of injured workers with and without disabilities who reported receiving workers' compensation benefits (46.7% vs. 48.2%, p-value = 0.718).

CONCLUSIONS

Workers with persistent disabilities had a significantly higher incidence of occupational injuries and higher medical costs compared with workers without persistent disabilities. Many questions with regard to occupational safety and worker's compensation benefits in workers with disabilities remain unexplored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA.Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA.College of Public Health, Division of Biostatistics, The Ohio State University, USA.Injury Research and Policy, Johns Hopkins Center for International Injury Research Unit, Johns Hopkins University, USA.Colorado Injury Control Research Center, Colorado State University, USA.Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA; Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA; The Ohio State University College of Medicine, USA. Electronic address: Huiyun.Xiang@NationwideChildrens.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25573252

Citation

Shi, Junxin, et al. "Medical Expenditures Associated With Nonfatal Occupational Injuries Among U.S. Workers Reporting Persistent Disabilities." Disability and Health Journal, vol. 8, no. 3, 2015, pp. 397-406.
Shi J, Wheeler KK, Lu B, et al. Medical expenditures associated with nonfatal occupational injuries among U.S. workers reporting persistent disabilities. Disabil Health J. 2015;8(3):397-406.
Shi, J., Wheeler, K. K., Lu, B., Bishai, D. M., Stallones, L., & Xiang, H. (2015). Medical expenditures associated with nonfatal occupational injuries among U.S. workers reporting persistent disabilities. Disability and Health Journal, 8(3), 397-406. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2014.10.004
Shi J, et al. Medical Expenditures Associated With Nonfatal Occupational Injuries Among U.S. Workers Reporting Persistent Disabilities. Disabil Health J. 2015;8(3):397-406. PubMed PMID: 25573252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical expenditures associated with nonfatal occupational injuries among U.S. workers reporting persistent disabilities. AU - Shi,Junxin, AU - Wheeler,Krista K, AU - Lu,Bo, AU - Bishai,David M, AU - Stallones,Lorann, AU - Xiang,Huiyun, Y1 - 2014/12/02/ PY - 2014/03/20/received PY - 2014/09/04/revised PY - 2014/10/16/accepted PY - 2015/1/10/entrez PY - 2015/1/13/pubmed PY - 2016/3/2/medline KW - Activity limitations KW - Disability KW - Functional limitations KW - Health care expenditure KW - Occupational injury SP - 397 EP - 406 JF - Disability and health journal JO - Disabil Health J VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: No prior study has investigated the medical expenditures associated with occupational injuries among U.S. workers with persistent disabilities, including those with physical disabilities or cognitive limitations. OBJECTIVE: Using the 2004-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data (Panels 9-15), we estimated the 2-year incidence and the expenditures associated with occupational injuries in U.S. workers with and without persistent disabilities. METHODS: Expenditures were compared by type of service and sources of payment. We estimated the mean medical expenditures using linear regression analysis to adjust for sociodemographics. The statistical analysis accounted for the sample survey design of MEPS and the highly skewed expenditure data. RESULTS: The 2-year cumulative incidence of occupational injuries was 13.6% (95% CI: 11.6%-15.6%) in workers with persistent disabilities and 7.1% (95% CI: 6.8%-7.4%) in workers without persistent disabilities. The average medical expenditure associated with new occupational injuries in the 2-year follow-up period was $3778 in workers with disabilities, $2212 in workers without disabilities after adjusting for sociodemographics and medical insurance coverage status (in 2011 U.S. dollars, p-value = 0.0004). Of the total expenditures for occupational injuries, workers' compensation paid 54.6% in workers with disabilities and 58.9% in workers without disabilities. There was no significant difference in the proportion of injured workers with and without disabilities who reported receiving workers' compensation benefits (46.7% vs. 48.2%, p-value = 0.718). CONCLUSIONS: Workers with persistent disabilities had a significantly higher incidence of occupational injuries and higher medical costs compared with workers without persistent disabilities. Many questions with regard to occupational safety and worker's compensation benefits in workers with disabilities remain unexplored. SN - 1876-7583 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25573252/Medical_expenditures_associated_with_nonfatal_occupational_injuries_among_U_S__workers_reporting_persistent_disabilities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1936-6574(14)00187-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -