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Anisomycin in the medial prefrontal cortex reduces reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memories in the rat self-administration model.
Neuropharmacology. 2015 May; 92:25-33.N

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that infusion of anisomycin into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) disrupts the reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated memory in the rat cocaine self-administration model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) along with a cue light presentation on an FR1 followed by an FR3 schedule of reinforcement for 2 h/day. Rats were then given extinction sessions or an equivalent forced abstinence period followed by a 5 min memory reactivation session during which time they received an ip cocaine injection (10 mg/kg, ip) and were allowed to press for contingent cue light presentation. Immediately after reactivation, they were administered an intra-mPFC infusion of vehicle or anisomycin. Two additional control groups received extinction and either no memory reactivation and intra-mPFC infusions as above or intra-mPFC infusions 6 h after memory reactivation. A fourth group received forced abstinence and intra-mPFC infusions immediately after memory reactivation. Combined cocaine + cue-induced reinstatement was given 2-3 days (early) and 8-12 days (late) later. Rats given anisomycin in the Extinction + Reactivation demonstrated decreased reinstatement, while anisomycin treatment did not alter behavior in any of the other three groups. These results suggest that extinction training may recruit the mPFC such that it renders the memory susceptible to disruption by anisomycin. These findings have implications for using extinction training prior to or in conjunction with other therapies, including reconsolidation disruption, to enhance prefrontal control over drug-seeking behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Translational Addiction Research Center and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program, Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Vancouver, WA 98686, USA. Electronic address: sorg@vetmed.wsu.edu.Translational Addiction Research Center and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program, Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Vancouver, WA 98686, USA.Translational Addiction Research Center and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program, Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Vancouver, WA 98686, USA.Translational Addiction Research Center and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program, Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25576371

Citation

Sorg, Barbara A., et al. "Anisomycin in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Reconsolidation of Cocaine-associated Memories in the Rat Self-administration Model." Neuropharmacology, vol. 92, 2015, pp. 25-33.
Sorg BA, Todd RP, Slaker M, et al. Anisomycin in the medial prefrontal cortex reduces reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memories in the rat self-administration model. Neuropharmacology. 2015;92:25-33.
Sorg, B. A., Todd, R. P., Slaker, M., & Churchill, L. (2015). Anisomycin in the medial prefrontal cortex reduces reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memories in the rat self-administration model. Neuropharmacology, 92, 25-33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2014.12.029
Sorg BA, et al. Anisomycin in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Reconsolidation of Cocaine-associated Memories in the Rat Self-administration Model. Neuropharmacology. 2015;92:25-33. PubMed PMID: 25576371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anisomycin in the medial prefrontal cortex reduces reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memories in the rat self-administration model. AU - Sorg,Barbara A, AU - Todd,Ryan P, AU - Slaker,Megan, AU - Churchill,Lynn, Y1 - 2015/01/07/ PY - 2014/06/09/received PY - 2014/12/12/revised PY - 2014/12/22/accepted PY - 2015/1/11/entrez PY - 2015/1/13/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - Cocaine KW - Extinction KW - Medial prefrontal cortex KW - Memory KW - Reconsolidation SP - 25 EP - 33 JF - Neuropharmacology JO - Neuropharmacology VL - 92 N2 - We tested the hypothesis that infusion of anisomycin into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) disrupts the reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated memory in the rat cocaine self-administration model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) along with a cue light presentation on an FR1 followed by an FR3 schedule of reinforcement for 2 h/day. Rats were then given extinction sessions or an equivalent forced abstinence period followed by a 5 min memory reactivation session during which time they received an ip cocaine injection (10 mg/kg, ip) and were allowed to press for contingent cue light presentation. Immediately after reactivation, they were administered an intra-mPFC infusion of vehicle or anisomycin. Two additional control groups received extinction and either no memory reactivation and intra-mPFC infusions as above or intra-mPFC infusions 6 h after memory reactivation. A fourth group received forced abstinence and intra-mPFC infusions immediately after memory reactivation. Combined cocaine + cue-induced reinstatement was given 2-3 days (early) and 8-12 days (late) later. Rats given anisomycin in the Extinction + Reactivation demonstrated decreased reinstatement, while anisomycin treatment did not alter behavior in any of the other three groups. These results suggest that extinction training may recruit the mPFC such that it renders the memory susceptible to disruption by anisomycin. These findings have implications for using extinction training prior to or in conjunction with other therapies, including reconsolidation disruption, to enhance prefrontal control over drug-seeking behavior. SN - 1873-7064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25576371/Anisomycin_in_the_medial_prefrontal_cortex_reduces_reconsolidation_of_cocaine_associated_memories_in_the_rat_self_administration_model_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3908(14)00480-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -