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Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers.
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2015 Jun; 18(3):507-21.AW

Abstract

Maternal psychopathology and traumatic life experiences may adversely impact family functioning, the quality of the parent-child relationship and the attachment bond, placing the child's early social-emotional development at risk. Attachment-based parenting interventions may be particularly useful in decreasing negative outcomes for children exposed to risk contexts, yet high risk families frequently do not engage in programs to address mental health and/or parenting needs. This study evaluated the effects of Mom Power (MP), a 13-session parenting and self-care skills group program for high-risk mothers and their young children (age <6 years old), focused on enhancing mothers' mental health, parenting competence, and engagement in treatment. Mothers were referred from community health providers for a phase 1 trial to assess feasibility, acceptability, and pilot outcomes. At baseline, many reported several identified risk factors, including trauma exposure, psychopathology, poverty, and single parenthood. Ninety-nine mother-child pairs were initially recruited into the MP program with 68 women completing and providing pre- and post-self-report measures assessing demographics and trauma history (pre-assessment only), maternal mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), parenting, and intervention satisfaction. Results indicate that MP participation was associated with reduction in depression, PTSD, and caregiving helplessness. A dose response relationship was evident in that, despite baseline equivalence, women who attended ≥70 % of the 10 groups (completers; N = 68) improved on parenting and mental health outcomes, in contrast to non-completers (N = 12). Effects were most pronounced for women with a mental health diagnosis at baseline. The intervention was perceived as helpful and user-friendly. Results indicate that MP is feasible, acceptable, and holds promise for improving maternal mental health and parenting competence among high-risk dyads. Further research is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of MP using randomized controlled designs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Depression Center, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2701, USA, muzik@med.umich.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25577336

Citation

Muzik, Maria, et al. "Mom Power: Preliminary Outcomes of a Group Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Parenting Among High-risk Mothers." Archives of Women's Mental Health, vol. 18, no. 3, 2015, pp. 507-21.
Muzik M, Rosenblum KL, Alfafara EA, et al. Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers. Arch Womens Ment Health. 2015;18(3):507-21.
Muzik, M., Rosenblum, K. L., Alfafara, E. A., Schuster, M. M., Miller, N. M., Waddell, R. M., & Stanton Kohler, E. (2015). Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers. Archives of Women's Mental Health, 18(3), 507-21. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00737-014-0490-z
Muzik M, et al. Mom Power: Preliminary Outcomes of a Group Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Parenting Among High-risk Mothers. Arch Womens Ment Health. 2015;18(3):507-21. PubMed PMID: 25577336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers. AU - Muzik,Maria, AU - Rosenblum,Katherine L, AU - Alfafara,Emily A, AU - Schuster,Melisa M, AU - Miller,Nicole M, AU - Waddell,Rachel M, AU - Stanton Kohler,Emily, Y1 - 2015/01/11/ PY - 2014/06/02/received PY - 2014/12/24/accepted PY - 2015/1/12/entrez PY - 2015/1/13/pubmed PY - 2015/9/15/medline SP - 507 EP - 21 JF - Archives of women's mental health JO - Arch Womens Ment Health VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - Maternal psychopathology and traumatic life experiences may adversely impact family functioning, the quality of the parent-child relationship and the attachment bond, placing the child's early social-emotional development at risk. Attachment-based parenting interventions may be particularly useful in decreasing negative outcomes for children exposed to risk contexts, yet high risk families frequently do not engage in programs to address mental health and/or parenting needs. This study evaluated the effects of Mom Power (MP), a 13-session parenting and self-care skills group program for high-risk mothers and their young children (age <6 years old), focused on enhancing mothers' mental health, parenting competence, and engagement in treatment. Mothers were referred from community health providers for a phase 1 trial to assess feasibility, acceptability, and pilot outcomes. At baseline, many reported several identified risk factors, including trauma exposure, psychopathology, poverty, and single parenthood. Ninety-nine mother-child pairs were initially recruited into the MP program with 68 women completing and providing pre- and post-self-report measures assessing demographics and trauma history (pre-assessment only), maternal mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), parenting, and intervention satisfaction. Results indicate that MP participation was associated with reduction in depression, PTSD, and caregiving helplessness. A dose response relationship was evident in that, despite baseline equivalence, women who attended ≥70 % of the 10 groups (completers; N = 68) improved on parenting and mental health outcomes, in contrast to non-completers (N = 12). Effects were most pronounced for women with a mental health diagnosis at baseline. The intervention was perceived as helpful and user-friendly. Results indicate that MP is feasible, acceptable, and holds promise for improving maternal mental health and parenting competence among high-risk dyads. Further research is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of MP using randomized controlled designs. SN - 1435-1102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25577336/Mom_Power:_preliminary_outcomes_of_a_group_intervention_to_improve_mental_health_and_parenting_among_high_risk_mothers_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00737-014-0490-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -