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Natural products as photoprotection.
J Cosmet Dermatol. 2015 Mar; 14(1):47-63.JC

Abstract

The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Cosmetic Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Muang, Chiangrai, Thailand.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25582033

Citation

Saewan, Nisakorn, and Ampa Jimtaisong. "Natural Products as Photoprotection." Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, vol. 14, no. 1, 2015, pp. 47-63.
Saewan N, Jimtaisong A. Natural products as photoprotection. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2015;14(1):47-63.
Saewan, N., & Jimtaisong, A. (2015). Natural products as photoprotection. Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 14(1), 47-63. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12123
Saewan N, Jimtaisong A. Natural Products as Photoprotection. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2015;14(1):47-63. PubMed PMID: 25582033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Natural products as photoprotection. AU - Saewan,Nisakorn, AU - Jimtaisong,Ampa, Y1 - 2015/01/12/ PY - 2014/08/15/accepted PY - 2015/1/14/entrez PY - 2015/1/15/pubmed PY - 2015/11/17/medline KW - UV radiation KW - natural product KW - photoprotection KW - sunscreens SP - 47 EP - 63 JF - Journal of cosmetic dermatology JO - J Cosmet Dermatol VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage. SN - 1473-2165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25582033/Natural_products_as_photoprotection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12123 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -