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U.S. adults and child snacking patterns among sugar-sweetened beverage drinkers and non-drinkers.
Prev Med. 2015 Mar; 72:8-14.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide national estimates of snack patterns for sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) drinkers and non-SSB drinkers among U.S. children and adults.

METHODS

We analyzed 24-h dietary recall data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 among children (ages 2 to 19) and adults (aged 20 and older) (N=46,932).

RESULTS

For children and adults, SSB drinkers were significantly more likely than non-SSB drinkers to consume snacks (children: salty, 60% vs. 50%; sweet, 69% vs. 65%; adults: salty, 64% vs. 58%; sweet, 64% vs. 58%), calories from snacks (children: salty snacks, 258 vs. 213 kcal; sweet snacks, 322 vs. 291 kcal; adults: salty snacks, 261 vs. 236 kcal; sweet snacks, 370 vs. 350 kcal), and total calories (children: 2098 vs. 1,804 kcal; adults: 2329 vs. 2,049 kcal) (p<0.05). Among adolescents, Blacks had a significantly higher percentage of SSB drinkers and salty snack consumers than Whites and Hispanics (SSB consumers: White, 79%; Black, 86%; Hispanic, 82%; salty snack consumers: White, 56%; Black, 62%; Hispanic, 54%; p<0.05). All ages were more likely to consume sweet snacks at home (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Adults and children who drink SSBs are more likely to snack and consume more calories from snacks than non-SSB drinkers, particularly Black adolescents and young adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: sbleich@jhsph.edu.Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25584987

Citation

Bleich, Sara N., and Julia A. Wolfson. "U.S. Adults and Child Snacking Patterns Among Sugar-sweetened Beverage Drinkers and Non-drinkers." Preventive Medicine, vol. 72, 2015, pp. 8-14.
Bleich SN, Wolfson JA. U.S. adults and child snacking patterns among sugar-sweetened beverage drinkers and non-drinkers. Prev Med. 2015;72:8-14.
Bleich, S. N., & Wolfson, J. A. (2015). U.S. adults and child snacking patterns among sugar-sweetened beverage drinkers and non-drinkers. Preventive Medicine, 72, 8-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.01.003
Bleich SN, Wolfson JA. U.S. Adults and Child Snacking Patterns Among Sugar-sweetened Beverage Drinkers and Non-drinkers. Prev Med. 2015;72:8-14. PubMed PMID: 25584987.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - U.S. adults and child snacking patterns among sugar-sweetened beverage drinkers and non-drinkers. AU - Bleich,Sara N, AU - Wolfson,Julia A, Y1 - 2015/01/10/ PY - 2014/08/15/received PY - 2014/12/30/revised PY - 2015/01/05/accepted PY - 2015/1/14/entrez PY - 2015/1/15/pubmed PY - 2015/9/25/medline KW - Adults KW - Children KW - Snack consumption KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 8 EP - 14 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 72 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To provide national estimates of snack patterns for sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) drinkers and non-SSB drinkers among U.S. children and adults. METHODS: We analyzed 24-h dietary recall data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 among children (ages 2 to 19) and adults (aged 20 and older) (N=46,932). RESULTS: For children and adults, SSB drinkers were significantly more likely than non-SSB drinkers to consume snacks (children: salty, 60% vs. 50%; sweet, 69% vs. 65%; adults: salty, 64% vs. 58%; sweet, 64% vs. 58%), calories from snacks (children: salty snacks, 258 vs. 213 kcal; sweet snacks, 322 vs. 291 kcal; adults: salty snacks, 261 vs. 236 kcal; sweet snacks, 370 vs. 350 kcal), and total calories (children: 2098 vs. 1,804 kcal; adults: 2329 vs. 2,049 kcal) (p<0.05). Among adolescents, Blacks had a significantly higher percentage of SSB drinkers and salty snack consumers than Whites and Hispanics (SSB consumers: White, 79%; Black, 86%; Hispanic, 82%; salty snack consumers: White, 56%; Black, 62%; Hispanic, 54%; p<0.05). All ages were more likely to consume sweet snacks at home (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Adults and children who drink SSBs are more likely to snack and consume more calories from snacks than non-SSB drinkers, particularly Black adolescents and young adults. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25584987/U_S__adults_and_child_snacking_patterns_among_sugar_sweetened_beverage_drinkers_and_non_drinkers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(15)00005-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -