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Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.
Food Funct. 2015 Mar; 6(3):719-29.FF

Abstract

Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, The University of Glasgow, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. Emilie.CombetAspray@glasgow.ac.uk.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25585200

Citation

Shahzad, Muhammad, et al. "Selected Dietary (poly)phenols Inhibit Periodontal Pathogen Growth and Biofilm Formation." Food & Function, vol. 6, no. 3, 2015, pp. 719-29.
Shahzad M, Millhouse E, Culshaw S, et al. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation. Food Funct. 2015;6(3):719-29.
Shahzad, M., Millhouse, E., Culshaw, S., Edwards, C. A., Ramage, G., & Combet, E. (2015). Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation. Food & Function, 6(3), 719-29. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4fo01087f
Shahzad M, et al. Selected Dietary (poly)phenols Inhibit Periodontal Pathogen Growth and Biofilm Formation. Food Funct. 2015;6(3):719-29. PubMed PMID: 25585200.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation. AU - Shahzad,Muhammad, AU - Millhouse,Emma, AU - Culshaw,Shauna, AU - Edwards,Christine A, AU - Ramage,Gordon, AU - Combet,Emilie, PY - 2015/1/14/entrez PY - 2015/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/2/13/medline SP - 719 EP - 29 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 6 IS - 3 N2 - Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal diseases. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25585200/Selected_dietary__poly_phenols_inhibit_periodontal_pathogen_growth_and_biofilm_formation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c4fo01087f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -