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Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japan: a 24-year follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Apr; 69(4):482-8.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

There have been few studies on the association of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Asian populations where both dietary habits and disease structure are different from western countries. No study in Asia has found its significant association with stroke. We examined associations of FV intake with mortality risk from total CVD, stroke and coronary heart diseases (CHDs) in a representative Japanese sample.

METHODS

A total of 9112 participants aged from 24-year follow-up data in the NIPPON DATA80, of which baseline data were obtained in the National Nutrition Survey Japan in 1980, were studied. Dietary data were obtained from 3-day weighing dietary records. Participants were divided into sex-specific quartiles of energy adjusted intake of FV. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated between strata of the total of FV intake, fruit intake and vegetable intake. The adjustment included age, sex, smoking, drinking habit and energy adjusted intakes of sodium and some other food groups.

RESULTS

Participants with higher FV intake were older, ate more fish, milk and dairy products and soybeans and legumes and ate less meat. Multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval; P; P for trend) for the highest versus the lowest quartile of the total of FV intake was 0.74 (0.61-0.91; 0.004; 0.003) for total CVD, 0.80 (0.59-1.09; 0.105; 0.036) for stroke and 0.57 (0.37-0.87; 0.010; 0.109) for CHD.

CONCLUSIONS

The results showed that higher total intake of FVs was significantly associated with reduced risk of CVD mortality in Japan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Nutrition, University of Human Arts and Sciences, Saitama, Japan.1] Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan [2] Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.Research Institute of Strategy for Prevention, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.Center for International Collaboration and Partnership, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.Department of Nursing Science, Tsuruga Nursing University, Tsuruga, Japan.Department of Public Health, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi, Japan.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan.Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.1] Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan [2] Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25585600

Citation

Okuda, N, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease in Japan: a 24-year Follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 69, no. 4, 2015, pp. 482-8.
Okuda N, Miura K, Okayama A, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japan: a 24-year follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015;69(4):482-8.
Okuda, N., Miura, K., Okayama, A., Okamura, T., Abbott, R. D., Nishi, N., Fujiyoshi, A., Kita, Y., Nakamura, Y., Miyagawa, N., Hayakawa, T., Ohkubo, T., Kiyohara, Y., & Ueshima, H. (2015). Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japan: a 24-year follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 69(4), 482-8. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2014.276
Okuda N, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease in Japan: a 24-year Follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015;69(4):482-8. PubMed PMID: 25585600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japan: a 24-year follow-up of the NIPPON DATA80 Study. AU - Okuda,N, AU - Miura,K, AU - Okayama,A, AU - Okamura,T, AU - Abbott,R D, AU - Nishi,N, AU - Fujiyoshi,A, AU - Kita,Y, AU - Nakamura,Y, AU - Miyagawa,N, AU - Hayakawa,T, AU - Ohkubo,T, AU - Kiyohara,Y, AU - Ueshima,H, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/01/14/ PY - 2014/02/13/received PY - 2014/08/23/revised PY - 2014/12/02/accepted PY - 2015/1/15/entrez PY - 2015/1/15/pubmed PY - 2015/12/22/medline SP - 482 EP - 8 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 69 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: There have been few studies on the association of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Asian populations where both dietary habits and disease structure are different from western countries. No study in Asia has found its significant association with stroke. We examined associations of FV intake with mortality risk from total CVD, stroke and coronary heart diseases (CHDs) in a representative Japanese sample. METHODS: A total of 9112 participants aged from 24-year follow-up data in the NIPPON DATA80, of which baseline data were obtained in the National Nutrition Survey Japan in 1980, were studied. Dietary data were obtained from 3-day weighing dietary records. Participants were divided into sex-specific quartiles of energy adjusted intake of FV. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated between strata of the total of FV intake, fruit intake and vegetable intake. The adjustment included age, sex, smoking, drinking habit and energy adjusted intakes of sodium and some other food groups. RESULTS: Participants with higher FV intake were older, ate more fish, milk and dairy products and soybeans and legumes and ate less meat. Multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval; P; P for trend) for the highest versus the lowest quartile of the total of FV intake was 0.74 (0.61-0.91; 0.004; 0.003) for total CVD, 0.80 (0.59-1.09; 0.105; 0.036) for stroke and 0.57 (0.37-0.87; 0.010; 0.109) for CHD. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that higher total intake of FVs was significantly associated with reduced risk of CVD mortality in Japan. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25585600/Fruit_and_vegetable_intake_and_mortality_from_cardiovascular_disease_in_Japan:_a_24_year_follow_up_of_the_NIPPON_DATA80_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2014.276 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -