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Influence of dietary zinc and copper on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink (Mustela vison).
Biol Trace Elem Res 2015; 165(1):59-66BT

Abstract

An experiment was conducted in a 3 × 3 (Cu × Zn) factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design to evaluate the effects of dietary copper and zinc on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink on a corn-fish meal based diet. Animals were fed basal diets supplemented with Cu from copper sulfate (CuSO4) and Zn from zinc sulfate (ZnSO4). Supplemental Cu levels were 0, 15, and 30 mg/kg copper, respectively, while supplemental Zn levels were 0, 150, and 300 mg/kg, respectively. A metabolism trial of 4 days was conducted during the last week of experimental feeding. Blood samples were collected via the toe clip to determine blood hematology and blood metabolites. Copper excretion, retention, and digestibility were influenced by dietary copper (P < 0.05), however, there was also a zinc-copper interaction. Copper digestibility and retention were substantially reduced when zinc was added to the low copper diet but showed little change with zinc supplementation of the high copper diet. Both plasma Cu and plasma Zn were influenced by dietary level of the respective mineral (P < 0.05). There was no influence of dietary copper on plasma zinc; however, high Zn in the diet reduced plasma Cu concentrations. There was a zinc-copper interaction for plasma Cu (P = 0.053). Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) activity tended to be influenced by dietary zinc (P = 0.065) and dietary copper (P = 0.035). Dietary copper had a significant effect on ceruloplasmin (CER) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P < 0.05). Our results show that moderately high Zn in the diet (Zn:Cu ratio of 40:1) significantly reduce the apparent Cu digestibility. Our results also show that moderately high Cu in the diet increases Cu retention, but not reduces Zn absorption, and moderately high Zn in the diet reduced plasma Cu concentrations and CER activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Feed Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25586620

Citation

Wu, Xuezhuang, et al. "Influence of Dietary Zinc and Copper On Apparent Mineral Retention and Serum Biochemical Indicators in Young Male Mink (Mustela Vison)." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 165, no. 1, 2015, pp. 59-66.
Wu X, Liu Z, Guo J, et al. Influence of dietary zinc and copper on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink (Mustela vison). Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015;165(1):59-66.
Wu, X., Liu, Z., Guo, J., Wan, C., Zhang, T., Cui, H., ... Gao, X. (2015). Influence of dietary zinc and copper on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink (Mustela vison). Biological Trace Element Research, 165(1), pp. 59-66. doi:10.1007/s12011-014-0220-4.
Wu X, et al. Influence of Dietary Zinc and Copper On Apparent Mineral Retention and Serum Biochemical Indicators in Young Male Mink (Mustela Vison). Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015;165(1):59-66. PubMed PMID: 25586620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of dietary zinc and copper on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink (Mustela vison). AU - Wu,Xuezhuang, AU - Liu,Zhi, AU - Guo,Jungang, AU - Wan,Chunmeng, AU - Zhang,Tietao, AU - Cui,Hu, AU - Yang,Fuhe, AU - Gao,Xiuhua, Y1 - 2015/01/15/ PY - 2014/10/19/received PY - 2014/12/22/accepted PY - 2015/1/15/entrez PY - 2015/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/1/12/medline SP - 59 EP - 66 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 165 IS - 1 N2 - An experiment was conducted in a 3 × 3 (Cu × Zn) factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design to evaluate the effects of dietary copper and zinc on apparent mineral retention and serum biochemical indicators in young male mink on a corn-fish meal based diet. Animals were fed basal diets supplemented with Cu from copper sulfate (CuSO4) and Zn from zinc sulfate (ZnSO4). Supplemental Cu levels were 0, 15, and 30 mg/kg copper, respectively, while supplemental Zn levels were 0, 150, and 300 mg/kg, respectively. A metabolism trial of 4 days was conducted during the last week of experimental feeding. Blood samples were collected via the toe clip to determine blood hematology and blood metabolites. Copper excretion, retention, and digestibility were influenced by dietary copper (P < 0.05), however, there was also a zinc-copper interaction. Copper digestibility and retention were substantially reduced when zinc was added to the low copper diet but showed little change with zinc supplementation of the high copper diet. Both plasma Cu and plasma Zn were influenced by dietary level of the respective mineral (P < 0.05). There was no influence of dietary copper on plasma zinc; however, high Zn in the diet reduced plasma Cu concentrations. There was a zinc-copper interaction for plasma Cu (P = 0.053). Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) activity tended to be influenced by dietary zinc (P = 0.065) and dietary copper (P = 0.035). Dietary copper had a significant effect on ceruloplasmin (CER) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P < 0.05). Our results show that moderately high Zn in the diet (Zn:Cu ratio of 40:1) significantly reduce the apparent Cu digestibility. Our results also show that moderately high Cu in the diet increases Cu retention, but not reduces Zn absorption, and moderately high Zn in the diet reduced plasma Cu concentrations and CER activity. SN - 1559-0720 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25586620/Influence_of_dietary_zinc_and_copper_on_apparent_mineral_retention_and_serum_biochemical_indicators_in_young_male_mink__Mustela_vison__ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-014-0220-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -