Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Habitual sleep-wake behaviors and lifestyle as predictors of diurnal cortisol patterns in young breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal study.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015 Mar; 53:60-8.P

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to identify predictors of changes in diurnal cortisol patterns during the 8-month follow up period for young breast cancer survivors. Among the potential predictors were tumor size, lymph node metastasis, changes in sleep problems, habitual time of awakening and bedtime, physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI), and depressive levels across 8 months.

METHODS

The participants were 62 breast cancer women who were aged 40 years and below, and had completed active breast cancer treatment. The longitudinal data were collected at four points: baseline assessment (T0) and three follow-ups after baseline: T1 (in the 2nd month), T2 (in the 5th month), and T3 (in the 8th month). The participants collected their salivary cortisol at home at six time points: upon waking, 30 and 45min after waking, and at 1200h, 1700h, and 2100h. They also completed several questionnaires: the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep scale; the Beck Depression Inventory-II, physical activity levels on a 10-point scale, time of going to bed, time of awakening, and total sleep hours.

RESULTS

This study found that the main predictors of changes toward flatter diurnal cortisol patterns during the 8-month follow ups were greater tumor sizes, increases of BMI scores, and habitually later times of awakening.

CONCLUSIONS

While greater tumor sizes represent biological vulnerability of disruption of cortisol circadian rhythm, maintaining an appropriate BMI and good sleep habits could be a protective factor for normal cortisol regulation, which likely helps to reduce early mortality in young breast cancer survivors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, No.1, Jen-Ai Rd. Sec. 1, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: hsiaofei@ntu.edu.tw.Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Breast Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: brcancer@gmail.com.School of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, 510 Chung-Cheng Road, Hsin-Chuang, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: 039666@mail.fju.edu.tw.Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Cheng Ching General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: Kingjen@ntu.edu.tw.Department of Surgery, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei 10401, Taiwan. Electronic address: psyangd0039@gmail.com.Department of Surgery, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei 10401, Taiwan. Electronic address: hungbun@ms1.mmh.org.tw.Department of Surgery, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei 10401, Taiwan. Electronic address: jjlee@ms2.mmh.org.tw.Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Breast Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: huangcs@ntu.edu.tw.Breast Cancer Caring Unit, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: sophia_7799@yahoo.com.tw.School of Nursing, Chang-Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan. Electronic address: yulai@mail.cgu.edu.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25591116

Citation

Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu, et al. "Habitual Sleep-wake Behaviors and Lifestyle as Predictors of Diurnal Cortisol Patterns in Young Breast Cancer Survivors: a Longitudinal Study." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 53, 2015, pp. 60-8.
Hsiao FH, Kuo WH, Jow GM, et al. Habitual sleep-wake behaviors and lifestyle as predictors of diurnal cortisol patterns in young breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal study. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015;53:60-8.
Hsiao, F. H., Kuo, W. H., Jow, G. M., Chang, K. J., Yang, P. S., Lam, H. B., Lee, J. J., Huang, C. S., Liu, Y. F., & Lai, Y. M. (2015). Habitual sleep-wake behaviors and lifestyle as predictors of diurnal cortisol patterns in young breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal study. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 53, 60-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.12.014
Hsiao FH, et al. Habitual Sleep-wake Behaviors and Lifestyle as Predictors of Diurnal Cortisol Patterns in Young Breast Cancer Survivors: a Longitudinal Study. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015;53:60-8. PubMed PMID: 25591116.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Habitual sleep-wake behaviors and lifestyle as predictors of diurnal cortisol patterns in young breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal study. AU - Hsiao,Fei-Hsiu, AU - Kuo,Wen-Hung, AU - Jow,Guey-Mei, AU - Chang,King-Jen, AU - Yang,Po-Sheng, AU - Lam,Hung-Bun, AU - Lee,Jie-Jen, AU - Huang,Chiun-Sheng, AU - Liu,Yu-Fen, AU - Lai,Yu-Ming, Y1 - 2014/12/29/ PY - 2014/07/22/received PY - 2014/12/03/revised PY - 2014/12/19/accepted PY - 2015/1/16/entrez PY - 2015/1/16/pubmed PY - 2015/11/18/medline KW - BMI KW - Diurnal cortisol patterns KW - Lifestyle KW - Physical activity level KW - Sleep problems KW - Young breast cancer survivors SP - 60 EP - 8 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 53 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify predictors of changes in diurnal cortisol patterns during the 8-month follow up period for young breast cancer survivors. Among the potential predictors were tumor size, lymph node metastasis, changes in sleep problems, habitual time of awakening and bedtime, physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI), and depressive levels across 8 months. METHODS: The participants were 62 breast cancer women who were aged 40 years and below, and had completed active breast cancer treatment. The longitudinal data were collected at four points: baseline assessment (T0) and three follow-ups after baseline: T1 (in the 2nd month), T2 (in the 5th month), and T3 (in the 8th month). The participants collected their salivary cortisol at home at six time points: upon waking, 30 and 45min after waking, and at 1200h, 1700h, and 2100h. They also completed several questionnaires: the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep scale; the Beck Depression Inventory-II, physical activity levels on a 10-point scale, time of going to bed, time of awakening, and total sleep hours. RESULTS: This study found that the main predictors of changes toward flatter diurnal cortisol patterns during the 8-month follow ups were greater tumor sizes, increases of BMI scores, and habitually later times of awakening. CONCLUSIONS: While greater tumor sizes represent biological vulnerability of disruption of cortisol circadian rhythm, maintaining an appropriate BMI and good sleep habits could be a protective factor for normal cortisol regulation, which likely helps to reduce early mortality in young breast cancer survivors. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25591116/Habitual_sleep_wake_behaviors_and_lifestyle_as_predictors_of_diurnal_cortisol_patterns_in_young_breast_cancer_survivors:_a_longitudinal_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(14)00468-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -