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Effects of cooking methods on phenolic compounds in xoconostle (Opuntia joconostle).
Plant Foods Hum Nutr 2015; 70(1):85-90PF

Abstract

Xoconostle, the acidic cactus pear fruit of Opuntia joconostle of the Cactaceae family, is the source of several phytochemicals, such as betalain pigments and numerous phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of four cooking procedures (i.e., boiling, grilling, steaming and microwaving) on the total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity (measured by ABTS, DPPH, reducing power, and BCBA) of xoconostle. In addition, HPLC-DAD analyses were performed to identify and quantify individual phenolic compounds. After microwaving and steaming xoconostle, the TPC remained the same that in fresh samples, whereas both grilling and boiling produced a significant, 20% reduction (p ≤ 0.05). Total flavonoids remained unchanged in boiled and grilled xoconostle, but steaming and microwaving increased the flavonoid content by 13 and 20%, respectively. Steaming and microwaving did not produce significant changes in the antioxidant activity of xoconostle, whereas boiling and grilling result in significant decreases. The phenolic acids identified in xoconostle fruits were gallic, vanillic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, ferulic and protocatechuic acids; the flavonoids identified were epicatechin, catechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin and kaempferol. Based on the results, steaming and microwaving are the most suitable methods for retaining the highest level of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in xoconostle.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ingeniería Bioquímica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col, Santo Tomás, 11340, D.F, Mexico.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25595638

Citation

Cortez-García, Rosa María, et al. "Effects of Cooking Methods On Phenolic Compounds in Xoconostle (Opuntia Joconostle)." Plant Foods for Human Nutrition (Dordrecht, Netherlands), vol. 70, no. 1, 2015, pp. 85-90.
Cortez-García RM, Ortiz-Moreno A, Zepeda-Vallejo LG, et al. Effects of cooking methods on phenolic compounds in xoconostle (Opuntia joconostle). Plant Foods Hum Nutr. 2015;70(1):85-90.
Cortez-García, R. M., Ortiz-Moreno, A., Zepeda-Vallejo, L. G., & Necoechea-Mondragón, H. (2015). Effects of cooking methods on phenolic compounds in xoconostle (Opuntia joconostle). Plant Foods for Human Nutrition (Dordrecht, Netherlands), 70(1), pp. 85-90. doi:10.1007/s11130-014-0465-2.
Cortez-García RM, et al. Effects of Cooking Methods On Phenolic Compounds in Xoconostle (Opuntia Joconostle). Plant Foods Hum Nutr. 2015;70(1):85-90. PubMed PMID: 25595638.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of cooking methods on phenolic compounds in xoconostle (Opuntia joconostle). AU - Cortez-García,Rosa María, AU - Ortiz-Moreno,Alicia, AU - Zepeda-Vallejo,Luis Gerardo, AU - Necoechea-Mondragón,Hugo, PY - 2015/1/18/entrez PY - 2015/1/18/pubmed PY - 2015/10/20/medline SP - 85 EP - 90 JF - Plant foods for human nutrition (Dordrecht, Netherlands) JO - Plant Foods Hum Nutr VL - 70 IS - 1 N2 - Xoconostle, the acidic cactus pear fruit of Opuntia joconostle of the Cactaceae family, is the source of several phytochemicals, such as betalain pigments and numerous phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of four cooking procedures (i.e., boiling, grilling, steaming and microwaving) on the total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity (measured by ABTS, DPPH, reducing power, and BCBA) of xoconostle. In addition, HPLC-DAD analyses were performed to identify and quantify individual phenolic compounds. After microwaving and steaming xoconostle, the TPC remained the same that in fresh samples, whereas both grilling and boiling produced a significant, 20% reduction (p ≤ 0.05). Total flavonoids remained unchanged in boiled and grilled xoconostle, but steaming and microwaving increased the flavonoid content by 13 and 20%, respectively. Steaming and microwaving did not produce significant changes in the antioxidant activity of xoconostle, whereas boiling and grilling result in significant decreases. The phenolic acids identified in xoconostle fruits were gallic, vanillic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, ferulic and protocatechuic acids; the flavonoids identified were epicatechin, catechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin and kaempferol. Based on the results, steaming and microwaving are the most suitable methods for retaining the highest level of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in xoconostle. SN - 1573-9104 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25595638/Effects_of_cooking_methods_on_phenolic_compounds_in_xoconostle__Opuntia_joconostle__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11130-014-0465-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -